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Green Courtesy Lights for Nova Scotia Volunteer Firefighters

I would like to change the Highway Traffic Act of Nova Scotia. The Fire Service Association of Nova Scotia and The Fire Marshal Office of Nova Scotia are against the use of the Green Lights.

Here is a link to my web site about the Green Courtesy Lights

Please leave a comment, I would love to hear Firefighters comments about the use of Lights on Volunteer Firefighters Pov's.

If you would like to send an e-mail please do. miraroadvolfire@hotmail.com

Art

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Thirty-six firefighters died while responding to or returning from emergency incidents in 2003:
Below are the Firefighters that died responding or returning in their (POV) Personal Owen Vehicle.


January 8, 2003 – 1050hrs Lattie Floyd Collins, III, Firefighter Age 36, Volunteer Donalsonville Fire Department, Georgia
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 63.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Firefighter Collins was responding in his personal vehicle to a report of a motor vehicle crash. As he neared the fire station, he came to an intersection and met a responding engine approaching from the opposite di¬rection. Firefighter Collins’ vehicle and the engine stopped at their respective stops signs. Firefighter Collins was preparing to proceed across the intersection en route to the fire station and the engine was preparing to make a turn.
As Firefighter Collins proceeded through the intersection, his vehicle was struck on the right side by a vehi¬cle traveling on the intersecting highway. The force of the collision drove Firefighter Collins’ vehicle through the intersection, almost striking the responding engine. Firefighter Collins had apparently not seen the ve¬hicle that struck him due to a blind spot or as a result of being focused on the presence of the engine.
Firefighters immediately went to the aid of Firefighter Collins and found him lying across the front-seat of his car with his head against the passenger’s door. Firefighters could not find any vital signs but attempted to maintain an airway as extrication was accomplished.
Firefighter Collins was transported by ambulance to the hospital where he was pronounced dead upon ar¬rival. The cause of death was listed as closed head trauma complicated by positional asphyxia. Firefighter Collins was not wearing a seatbelt at the time of the crash. Firefighter Collins had been a member of the Donalsonville Fire Department for 3 months.

January 17, 2003 – 2256hrs James W. McAuley, Fire Police Officer Age 78, Volunteer Polk Township Volunteer Fire Department, Pennsylvania
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 65.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Fire Police Officer McAuley and the members of his department were dispatched to respond to a car fire on a local highway. Fire Police Officer McAuley assisted with traffic control and then waited in his vehicle for further orders.
After the fire was extinguished, a fire truck left the scene to refill its water tank and passed the spot where Fire Police Officer McAuley’s vehicle was staged. As the apparatus passed, Fire Police Officer McAuley moved his vehicle to the side of the road.
Approximately 5 minutes later, another fire truck left the scene and found Fire Police Officer McAuley slumped over the steering wheel of his vehicle. A firefighter removed Fire Police Officer McAuley from his vehicle and started CPR. An AED was used and administered two shocks. An ambulance arrived and trans¬ported Fire Police Officer McAuley to the hospital where he was pronounced dead.
The cause of death was listed as a heart attack.

March 18, 2003 – 0303hrs Charles Lance Mathew, Lieutenant Age 20, Volunteer LaBelle-Fannett Volunteer Fire Department, Texas
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 72.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Lieutenant Mathew responded to the scene of a motor vehicle crash in his personal vehicle. He was not wearing any reflective equipment or clothing.
Lieutenant Mathew arrived on the scene and parked his vehicle on the outside shoulder of the road opposite the scene of the crash. Lieutenant Mathew crossed the median and began to cross the road on the other side when a passing tractor-trailer truck struck him.
Lieutenant Mathew was thrown approximately 170 feet and came to rest in the median. He was severely injured and obviously deceased.

March 25, 2003 – 2330hrs Karlton Allen Cole Briscoe, Youth Firefighter Age 16, Volunteer Hickory Flat Volunteer Fire Department, Mississippi
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 74.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Youth Firefighter Briscoe was responding to a motor vehicle crash in his personal vehicle. His vehicle left the roadway, crashed into a ravine, and rolled several times.
Firefighters responded to the scene from the original crash and extricated Youth Firefighter Briscoe. He was transported to the hospital where he died as a result of his injuries.


May 5, 2003 – 0830hrs Harding O. Wentzell, Firefighter/Fire Police Officer Age 81, Volunteer Mexico Fire Department, Maine
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 79.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Fire Police Officer Wentzell was responding in his personal vehicle to a structure fire. He suffered a heart attack and his car left the roadway. The car traveled for some distance before hitting a tree. The engine com¬partment of the car burst into flames.
As bystanders and a police officer pulled Fire Police Officer Wentzell from the car, an explosion occurred. Mutual-aid firefighters arrived after being diverted from their response to the original structure fire.
The firefighters extinguished the car fire and provided medical treatment for Fire Police Officer Wentzell. Paramedics arrived and continued to provide treatment. Fire Police Officer Wentzell was transported to the hospital and later pronounced dead.

May 18, 2003 – 1130hrs Jason Lee Ellis, Firefighter Age 29, Paid-on-Call Loretto Fire Department, Tennessee
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 80.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Firefighter Ellis had been participating in a weekend training exercise at the Tennessee Fire Service and Codes Enforcement Academy. After the training activities were concluded, Firefighter Ellis was riding on the tail¬gate of a pickup owned and operated by another firefighter. The pickup was on the grounds of the Academy, traveling from the training site to the front of the campus. As the pickup accelerated, Firefighter Ellis fell from the vehicle and sustained a severe head injury.
Firefighter Ellis was treated at the scene and flown by medical helicopter to a regional hospital. Firefighter Ellis died on May 24, 2003, as a result of his head injuries.

June 16, 2003 – 1830hrs Randy Gene Utley, Firefighter/EMT Age 30, Volunteer Grayson Fire Department, Kentucky
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 83.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Firefighter Utley and members of his fire department were working numerous emergency calls associated with storms that were passing through the area. Firefighter Utley left the scene of a motor vehicle collision to respond to a mutual-aid request for assistance in a flooded area with trapped civilians.
Firefighter Utley was responding along a two-lane road with his emergency equipment in operation. He was driving his personal pickup truck.
Firefighter Utley’s pickup hydroplaned on the wet road surface, crossed over the opposing lane of the road, struck a ditch which turned the truck sideways, and collided with the support post of a billboard. The door on the driver’s side of the pickup sustained the major impact of the crash.
A motorist that came upon the crash site called 911 and firefighters from the Grayson Fire Department responded to the scene. Firefighter Utley was extricated and transported to a trauma center. He was pro¬nounced dead at the hospital.
Firefighter Utley was not wearing a seatbelt. Due to the lack of skid marks, his speed could not be estimated. The cause of death was listed as massive head and chest trauma.

July 28, 2003 – 1730hrs Randy Neal Jones, Lieutenant
Age 23, Volunteer Cool Springs Volunteer Fire Department, North Carolina
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 85 & 86.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Lieutenant Jones and another firefighter were responding in Lieutenant Jones’ personal vehicle, a 2000 Chevrolet pickup, to a report of a structure fire.
As they responded, the right wheels of the pickup left the roadway. Lieutenant Jones overcorrected to the left and the pickup began to slide sideways and rolled three times. It left the right side of the roadway and struck a power pole while airborne on the fourth roll. The vehicle then overturned a fifth time and came to rest on a side road. Both Lieutenant Jones and the other firefighter were ejected.
Firefighters responding to the structure fire were advised of the crash and some units were diverted to the crash scene. Firefighters found both Lieutenant Jones and the other firefighter injured. Lieutenant Jones was airlifted by helicopter from the scene but expired prior to his arrival at the hospital. The other firefighter was transported by ground ambulance and survived his injuries.
The police report on the crash estimated the pickup’s speed prior to the crash at 80 miles per hour in a 55 mile per hour zone. Neither Lieutenant Jones or his passenger was wearing seatbelts. The cause of death for Lieutenant Jones was an acute intracranial (head) injury.
The fire that caused the initial response was found to have multiple points of origin.

August 6, 2003 – 1216hrs Jeffery Alan Koval, Firefighter Age 41, Volunteer Inkom Fire Department, Idaho
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 86.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Firefighter Koval had been working a wildland fire with members of his department. He was detailed to go back into town and retrieve some supplies.
As he drove his city pickup back to the fire scene, he was involved in a single-vehicle crash. His car left the interstate highway; he crashed through a fence and then over an embankment. Firefighter Koval had to be extricated from the vehicle. He was transported to the hospital and pronounced dead.
Firefighter Koval was wearing his seatbelt.

September 20, 2003 – 0120hrs William A. Wheeler, Fire Police Officer Age 66, Volunteer Saxton Volunteer Fire Department, Pennsylvania
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 91.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Fire Police Officer Wheeler was responding to a motor vehicle crash with other members of his fire depart¬ment. He was driving his personal vehicle, a pickup truck. As he responded to the scene, Fire Police Officer Wheeler suffered a heart attack. His vehicle left the roadway and crashed into a utility pole. The airbag deployed during the crash but there was no damage to the interior of the cab.
Firefighters working at the scene of the original crash were informed of another crash involving a fire de¬partment member. Firefighters responded to the scene and found Fire Police Officer Wheeler behind the wheel in respiratory and cardiac arrest. Fire Police Officer Wheeler was rapidly extricated and provided with ALS-level emergency care on the scene. He was transported to the hospital where he was later pronounced dead.
The cause of death was listed as a cardiac arrhythmia with congestive heart failure due to a recent myocardial infarction due to occlusion of a coronary artery.
Fire Police Officer Wheeler was wearing his seatbelt at the time of the crash.


September 27, 2003 – 1745hrs James J. O’Shea, Firefighter 1st Grade Age 40, Career Fire Department City of New York, New York
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 91.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Firefighter O’Shea responded as a member of a ladder company to a fire that involved stacked cardboard boxes outside of an apartment complex. Firefighter O’Shea assisted with extensive overhaul and complained of not feeling well at the scene.
He declined medical assistance and went off-duty shortly after returning to his firehouse. He drove himself home and was found unconscious in the driveway, the victim of a heart attack. His family rushed him to the hospital but he could not be resuscitated.
A neighbourhood teenager intentionally started the fire. The teen was arrested and charged with arson.
The Fire Department City of New York suffered a second firefighter fatality in December of 2003.


November 8, 2003 – 1451hrs Matthew Karl Brimer, Firefighter Age 18, Volunteer Weaver Fire Department, Alabama
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 98.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Firefighter Brimer was responding in his personal vehicle to a report of a structure fire. As he drove around a curve, he lost control of the vehicle, skidded 226 feet, and sideways into an oak tree.
Firefighters responding to the initial incident were directed to the scene of the crash and were not aware that the incident involved Firefighter Brimer until they noticed a hat in the car. Firefighter Brimer was extricated by his fellow firefighters. He was pronounced dead at the scene.
Firefighter Brimer was wearing his seatbelt at the time of the crash. The law enforcement report on the in¬cident cited an estimated speed of 70 miles per hour in a 40 mile-per-hour zone.
Firefighter Brimer had just joined the fire department the previous May upon his 18th birthday. The struc¬ture fire that caused the initial response was found to be minor.

December 1, 2003 – 2230 hrs Nadar Hammett, Emergency Response Technician Age 29, Career Prince George’s County Fire/EMS Department, Maryland
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 100.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Emergency Response Technician (ERT) Hammett was driving home from department-mandated paramedic training. ERT Hammett’s vehicle was struck by another vehicle, causing it to leave the roadway, roll over, and hit a tree.
The driver of the other vehicle left the scene but returned about 30 minutes later and reported to the police. ERT Hammett was wearing his seatbelt.


December 21, 2003 – 0758hrs Benjamin Craig Rouchon, Firefighter Age 25, Volunteer Bluff Creek Fire Protection Territory, Louisiana
REFERENCE: 2003 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2003 Report, Page 104.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2003.pdf
Firefighter Rouchon was at home when his fire department was paged to respond to assist a local ambulance service at an EMS incident. Firefighter Rouchon responded in his personal pickup truck.
During the response, Firefighter Rouchon lost control of his vehicle, crossed over the centerline, bounced off of a tree, crossed the roadway again, and struck an embankment.
Firefighters and ambulance personnel responded to the scene and provided treatment for Firefighter Rouchon. Despite their efforts, Firefighter Rouchon died of massive head injuries.
Firefighter Rouchon was not wearing his seatbelt at the time of the crash.


Twenty-two firefighters died while responding to or returning from emergency incidents in 2004:
Below are the Firefighters that died responding or returning in their (POV) Personal Owen Vehicle.


January 24, 2004 – 1544hrsKevin Michael Shea, Fire Chief Age 54, Volunteer Elsmere Fire Department, New York
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 46.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Chief Shea and members of his fire department responded to a structure fire alarm in a local nursing home. The alarm was unfounded and all units returned to the fire station.
As firefighters were leaving the station, they noticed that Chief Shea was leaning over the center console in his vehicle. Firefighters discovered that.Chief.Shea.was.unconscious.and.in.distress..Chief.Shea.was.removed from the vehicle, and CPR was started. Upon arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) and paramedics, advanced cardiac life.support.(ACLS).measures.were.initiated,.and.Chief.Shea.was.transported.to.the.hospital. Despite.treatment.in.the.ambulance.and.at.the.hospital,.Chief.Shea.was.pronounced.dead.The.cause of death was listed as a heart attack.


February 23, 2004 – 1630hrsEdward P. Conricote, Firefighter Age 55, Volunteer Liberty Fire Department, Ohio
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 51 & 52.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Firefighter Conricote responded to the scene of a residential structure fire in his personal vehicle and arrived just before the first engine company. Firefighter Conricote assisted the engine’s driver/operator with supply line hook ups to a fire hydrant and opened the hydrant.
A police officer observed Firefighter Conricote trip over an object and asked if he was alright. Firefighter Conricote replied that he was fine and continued working. A firefighter left the fire-involved structure in search of a pike pole to hold open an overhead garage door. Firefighter Conricote.stepped.up.onto.the.back.of.the.engine.to.retrieve.the.tool.
Firefighter Conricote suddenly bent over and wrapped his arms around his midsection. The other firefighter asked if he was alright and received no answer. Firefighter Conricote fell backwards and landed on the roadway.
Firefighter Conricote was treated at the scene by firefighters and EMS workers and then transported to a local hospital. He did not respond to treatment and was pronounced dead at the hospital. The Cause of death was listed as a heart attack.

March 28, 2004 – 1630hrs James Harold Pennington, Fire Chief Age 63, Volunteer Unity-Frost Prairie Volunteer Fire Department, Arkansas
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 59.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Chief.Pennington.and.members.of.his.department.responded.to.a.wildland fire. Chief Pennington arrived in his personal vehicle and operated the pumper when it arrived on scene. After the fire was extinguished,.Chief.Pennington.complained.of.chest.pains..He.left.the.scene.and.went.home.to.rest. About.an.hour.and.a.half.after.leaving.the.scene,.Chief.Pennington.collapsed at home of an apparent heart attack. Firefighters who were at.Chief.Pennington’s.home.responded.immediately,.and.CPR.was.initiated..An.ambulance.transported.Chief.Pennington.to.the.hospital.where.he.was.pronounced.dead.
Children playing with matches caused the fire.

April 1, 2004 – 1211hrsJoseph Scott Northup, Firefighter Age 49, Volunteer Jessamine County Fire District, Kentucky
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 59 & 60.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
At 0830hrs, Firefighter Northup and members of his fire department responded to a fire call. Firefighter Northup responded in his personal vehicle but the call was cancelled by the IC prior to reaching the scene.
Firefighter Northup was not feeling well and called his wife to say that he was coming home. Firefighter Northup went to an EMS office complaining.of.chest.pain.at.approximately.1000hrs. He was placed on a cardiac monitor, and the results were normal. He was advised by EMS to go to the hospital but refused and said that he would go in if he felt worse later.
Just after noon, Firefighter Northup’s wife found him unresponsive on the couch at home. EMS was called and found Firefighter Northup pulse less and not breathing. He was treated at the scene, in the ambulance, and upon arrival at the hospital, but he could not be revived
The cause of death was listed as a heart attack.

April 6, 2004 – 1856hrsPhillip Stephen Hulen, Firefighter Age 19, Crossroads Fire Department, Inc., North Carolina
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 60 & 61.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Firefighter Hulen stopped by his fire station to pick up his protective clothing while en route to firefighter training at a local community college. Firefighter Hulen was preparing to attend his last night of class for Firefighter I & II certification.
Firefighter Hulen entered a curve in his personal vehicle, the right wheels of the vehicle left the roadway and struck a sign. The vehicle came back onto the roadway and then left the roadway again on the left side, it overturned, and then struck a tree. Firefighter Hulen was pronounced dead at the scene.
Firefighter Hulen was not wearing a seatbelt; however, an air bag was deployed as a result of the crash. The law enforcement crash report stated that the speed of the vehicle prior to the crash was 65 miles per hour in a 55 miles-per-hour zone.

April 10, 2004 – 1300hrs Kenneth Eugene Sterling, Firefighter/EMT Age 43, Career Westview - Fairforest Fire and EMS Department, South Carolina
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 62.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Firefighter/EMT Sterling responded to an incident at approximately 0700hrs. After returning from the incident, Firefighter Sterling went off duty.
At approximately 1300hrs, Firefighter Sterling was driving his personal vehicle when the vehicle swerved off of the road and came to rest. Firefighter Sterling was observed slumped over the steering wheel. Local firefighters responded but were unable to revive Firefighter Sterling. His death was caused by a heart attack.

May 3, 2004 – 1908hrs Grady Roy Austin, Captain Age 74, Volunteer Henderson County Fire Department, Tennessee
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 65.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Captain Austin and the members of his fire department were conducting regular monthly training. The subject of the night’s training was going to be pumping and drafting. There was not enough room in the fire station parking lot for the exercise, so the training was relocated to a school parking lot a few hundred feet from the fire station.
Some firefighters rode in apparatus from the station to the school parking lot, and others rode in personal vehicles. Captain Austin was a passenger on the tailgate of a pickup truck.
As the truck prepared for a turn, Captain Austin slipped from the tailgate and struck his head on the pavement. He received a severe head injury. Firefighters who witnessed the fall called for medical assistance and began treatment. CPR was initiated by firefighters and continued through the arrival of paramedics and transportation to the hospital.
Upon his arrival at the hospital, Captain Austin was pronounced dead as a result of his head injury.

May 14, 2004 – 0608hrs Michael Stokes Martin, Firefighter Age 18, Volunteer Ebenezer Volunteer Fire Department, South Carolina
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 67.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Firefighter Martin was responding to an EMS incident in his personal vehicle a.2004 Ford pickup truck.
As Firefighter Martin responded to the incident, the right wheels of the vehicle left the roadway. The vehicle came back onto the roadway and then left the roadway again on the left side, struck a culvert, and came to rest against a tree. Firefighter Martin was pronounced dead at the scene.
Firefighter Martin was not wearing a seatbelt, although an air bag was deployed as a result of the crash. The law enforcement crash report stated that the speed of the vehicle prior to the crash was 65 miles per hour in a 45 miles-per-hour zone.

June 19, 2004 – 1700hrsJoshua St. Jermaine Martin, Junior Firefighter Age 15, Volunteer Duson Volunteer Fire Department, Louisiana
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 69.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Junior Firefighter Martin was a front-seat passenger in a personally-owned 2000 Ford Explorer being driven by another firefighter. The firefighters were responding to an apartment fire and were operating grille-mounted red lights.
The driver lost control of the vehicle, it rotated counter-clockwise, crossed the center line of the roadway, and was struck on the right side by a vehicle traveling in the opposite direction. The crash occurred in daylight while light rain was falling. Water accumulation on the roadway may have played a role in the loss of control.
Junior Firefighter Martin was killed in the crash. Neither the driver nor Junior Firefighter Martin was wearing his seatbelt at the time of the crash.







June 22, 2004 – 2300hrs Kenneth W. Lipyance, Lieutenant Age 46, Volunteer Churchill Volunteer Fire Company, Pennsylvania
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 70.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Lieutenant Lipyance responded with members of his fire department to a motor vehicle crash that involved a piece of fire apparatus. Extrication was required at the scene, and Lieutenant Lipyance told other firefighters that he was not feeling well.
As the responders arrived back at their fire station, they came upon another motor vehicle crash a short distance from the station. Firefighters, including Lieutenant Lipyance, provided assistance on the scene of the second crash. Lieutenant Lipyance again told other firefighters that he was not feeling well, and then walked to the fire station.
Firefighters witnessed Lieutenant Lipyance drive slowly out of the fire station parking lot and then continue across four lanes of traffic until the vehicle hit the curb and came to rest. Lieutenant Lipyance was treated at the scene and then flown to a hospital by medical helicopter.
Lieutenant Lipyance died on June 30, 2004, as a result of a CVA and heart disease.


July 13, 2004 – 0800hrsDaniel Earl Elkins, CaptainAge 47, CareerLos Angeles County Fire Department, California
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 72 & 73.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
On July 12, 2004, Captain Elkins worked overtime at the Pine Fire Command Post (CP). When he was called in to work the fire, Captain Elkins drove to the CP in his personal vehicle. At 0715hrs on July 13, 2004, Captain Elkins was released from duty at Pine Fire and headed to his normal work assignment at Los Angeles County Fire Station 117.
As he drove to the fire station, Captain Elkins’ vehicle drifted off of the road, struck a berm/culvert, went airborne for approximately 94 feet, and overturned several times before coming to rest. Although he was wearing a seatbelt, and airbags did deploy, Captain Elkins was killed in the crash.

July 21, 2004 – 0030hrsLester Phillips, Fire ChiefAge 72, VolunteerSunshine Volunteer Fire Department, Kentucky
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 73.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Chief Phillips and the members of his department responded to a working fire in a manufactured home. The cause of the fire was arson. Chief Phillips complained of not feeling well at the scene. Firefighters helped Chief Phillips to his personal vehicle to get him away from the smoke. Chief Phillips drove back to the fire station and then to his home. After consulting with family members, Chief Phillips consented to go to the hospital. Chief Phillips did not recover from his heart attack and died on August 4, 2004.



August 22, 2004 – 1427hrsRobert E. Woolf, Firefighter Age 63, Volunteer Phillipsburg Fire Department, Ohio
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 77.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Firefighter Woolf and members of his fire department were in the process of cleaning up after a fundraising event. The fire department had borrowed tables and chairs from a local community center, and firefighters had returned a number of them in one firefighter’s personal pickup truck.
Firefighter Woolf and another firefighter were riding back to the fire station on the lowered tailgate of the pickup truck. The straps that hold the tailgate in position failed and both firefighters fell to the ground while the vehicle was in motion.
Another firefighter driving a vehicle following the pickup witnessed the fall and stopped immediately. Other firefighters began medical treatment immediately; Firefighter Woolf was motionless and unresponsive. He was transported quickly to the hospital. Hospital staff performed surgery on Firefighter Woolf the same day as the fall. He did not recover and died of his head injury on August 25, 2004. The injuries received by the other firefighter were non-life-threatening.

September 16, 2004 – 1934hrsClinton L. Romine, Firefighter Age 25, Volunteer Good Springs Volunteer Fire Department, Alabama
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 81.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Firefighter Romine was working with the members of his fire department and others to remove fallen trees from roadways in the wake of Hurricane Ivan.
Firefighter Romine went to a merchant to purchase a replacement chain for his personal saw. As he drove back to the fire station, a portion of a storm-damaged tree fell onto his personal vehicle. The fallen tree was approximately 2 ½ feet in diameter and fell directly on the cab of Firefighter Romine’s truck. He was killed instantly. A passenger in the truck received non-life-threatening injuries.

October 11, 2004 – 1810hrs Steven Charles Brack, Firefighter Age 36, Allentown Volunteer Fire Department, Georgia
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 84.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Firefighter Brack was responding from his home to a motor cehicle crash that required extrication. He was driving his personal vehicle.
Less than one-fourth mile from his home, Firefighter Brack lost control of his vehicle. The car left the roadway and struck a culvert. The car then became airborne, flipped several times, and came to rest. Firefighter Brack was killed.
The streets were wet, and it was raining at the time of the incident.




October 16, 2004 – 2015hrsJordan Lee Nonnemaker, Firefighter Age 18, Volunteer Amity Fire Company, Pennsylvania
REFERENCE: 2004 Firefighters Fatalities in the United States in 2004 Report, Page 85.
http://www.everyonegoeshome.com/resources/fatality/2004.pdf
Firefighter Nonnemaker was in his fire station with other firefighters. He left the station with another firefighter to rent movies to watch at the fire station.
Firefighter Nonnemaker was the front-seat passenger in a car driven by another firefighter. The firefighter lost control of the vehicle. It crossed the center line of the road, and an oncoming vehicle struck the passenger side of the firefighter’s vehicle. Firefighter Nonnemaker was killed instantly.
Hi Art
The simple fact is nobody can say if lights where responsible for those wrecks or not. Would they have driven slower if they didnt have the lights? Who knows..... Thats an argument you don't even want to have the powers to be to think of. If it was me I would try to leave that out of your argument completely, only because its not cut and dry and open to interpretation. I would probably try to hit heavily on the scene safety side of it, run your campaign by showing pictures of scenes with no lights compared to lighted with povs. I would also have a document pre made basically saying this is the bylaw if the FF does this while representing the dept, this will happen. Cut...dry and firm let them know your not going to abuse this wright and you want this because you want added safety at scenes and a better way to identify firefighters approaching the scenes.
stay safe brother
I think I can answer this post now. Take a look at the Pic I added. Yes there are Fire Fighter Falities due to responding in a Pov. But I find it hard to count in the Returning numbers when I am talking about Light for Responding. The numbers shown are for responding/Returning and some used Lights and some didn't.

I don't want to see 1 Fire Fighter Fatality in ant year but when looking at the numbers in each and every year on the chart more Fatalities were during Training and Stress/Overexertion. Now I no due to the numbers we won't stop training because of Fatalities to Fire Fighters. It would mean we better be safer while we are training and there are more reasons then I can mention here why the numbers are that high.

If we stopped using every tool in a Fire Fighters tool box due to the numbers we add up at the end of each year I don't think we would have any tools left.

It seems to me that we receive better training each and every year for which ever tool we use when we respond to an emergency.

I think with the right training in place, sop, sog and enforcement of the rules that Fire Fighters can respond with the use of a Light on or in their Pov. What do we do if a Fire Fighter during a response with a Fire Truck breaks the rules, we discipline him/her. The numbers are not to good for Fatalities in Tankers but I am sure we won't stop using them due to them. But I bet we will train our guys better dur to the stats provided to us and learn from what has taken place.

But to be honest Fire Fighter Fatalities are not caused by the Light because the numbers do include Fire Fighters without a Light.

Thanks
Art


Shawn Tibbitts said:
Hi Art
I agree with you on sometimes things arnt perceived the way we hope while posting apposed to face to face. I started doing a little research and started finding case after case of firefighters killed while responding in povs. You might not want to use that letter as "prof" you mentioned because its not accurate. I posted a few of the story's I found beneath hope this helps.
Stay safe


COLLINSVILLE, Miss. — In the early morning hours of Saturday, a call came in that there was an accident on West Lauderdale Road, and as he has done so many times in the more than 20 years as fire chief for the Collinsville Volunteer Fire Department, Clyde Walker said goodbye to his wife and headed in that direction.

But this time, Walker never made it to the scene. According to Lauderdale County Coroner Clayton Cobler, Walker's truck hydroplaned on Highway 19 and hit a tree, instantly killing the dedicated firefighter. It is a sad time for not only the fire department, but the entire Collinsville area. COLLINSVILLE, Miss. — In the early morning hours of Saturday, a call came in that there was an accident on West Lauderdale Road, and as he has done so many times in the more than 20 years as fire chief for the Collinsville Volunteer Fire Department, Clyde Walker said goodbye to his wife and headed in that direction.

REIDSVILLE, N.C. — A volunteer firefighter responding to a house fire was killed when his truck veered off a road and crashed in Reidsville.

The state Highway Patrol said 36-year-old Paul Ellington of Eden was traveling at a high rate of speed when his truck hit a stop sign Tuesday morning. The truck then crossed U.S. 29, rolled and crashed into several trees.

The Highway Patrol said Ellington was not wearing his seat belt.

Ellington was a 17-year veteran of the Oregon Hill Volunteer Fire Department. He was named the department's firefighter of the year in 2003.

ROWAN COUNTY, N.C. — Cold Water volunteer firefighter James Earl Arthur loved responding to emergencies.

The 19-year-old Concord High graduate had joined the fire department as soon as he turned 16 and was old enough.

On Monday night, his rush to get to a call cost him his life.

Around 7:20 p.m., Arthur was on his way home from his job at a textile mill in southern Rowan County when he heard his department paged to respond to a vehicle wreck, according to colleagues at the fire department.

He was heading north on Old Concord Road when he took a curve too fast about 3 miles south of China Grove, said N.C. Highway Patrol Trooper C.F. Rogers. He lost control of his pickup, overturned and was thrown from the truck. He wasn't wearing a seatbelt.

Rogers estimated that Arthur was going at least 75 miles per hour. The speed limit is 55, and a sign recommends 40 for the curve. Cold Water Fire Chief James Preddy Jr. said police give volunteer firefighters leeway when they turn their emergency lights on, but they're not allowed to speed.
MISSOULA, Mont. — A volunteer firefighter is dead after a tractor trailer crashed into his vehicle while he was responding to a wreck on Interstate 90 near Haugan.AMITY, Ark. — An Ark. volunteer was killed in the line of duty in his personal vehicle Thursday, according to the U.S. Fire Administration.

Tony McGough, 44, of the Amity Fire Department was responding to a medical call early Thursday morning when he was involved in a motor vehicle accident. McGough died of the injuries he sustained.AMITY, Ark. — An Ark. volunteer was killed in the line of duty in his personal vehicle Thursday, according to the U.S. Fire Administration.


LUMBERTON, N.C. — An 18-year-old volunteer firefighter was killed today when he lost control of his car on Deep Branch Road as he was answering a fire call.

Matthew Douglas Tramel, of 1617 Red Banks Road in Pembroke, died after his eastbound 2007 Nissan ran off the road and hit a tree at about 12:53 a.m., according to a report filed by Highway Patrol Trooper Alan Humphrey.

Tramel, a senior at Purnell Swett High School, had been with the Pembroke Fire Department for two months.


FAYETTEVILLE, Pa. — Pennsylvania State Police in Gettysburg, Pa., were investigating a vehicle accident Thursday night in which a firefighter en route to a mountain fire in Greene Township in Franklin County was killed.

Adam Cole, 24, of Biglerville, Pa., was pronounced dead at Gettysburg (Pa.) Hospital following the 8 p.m. accident on Buchanan Valley Road. Buchanan Valley Fire Co. Deputy Chief John Parr said Thursday evening that one of the company’s firefighters had been killed in an accident.

Police said Cole was driving a 2005 Subaru Impreza west on Buchanan Valley Road when he lost control on a curve. The Impreza crossed into the eastbound lane and collided with a 1997 Chevrolet 1500 pickup truck driven by Charles Amick, 66, of Roaring Spring, Pa.


OLIVET, Mich. — A volunteer firefighter with the Olivet Fire Department was killed shortly before 8 p.m. Tuesday when his car struck a large tree that had fallen onto a roadway.

The Eaton County Sheriff's Department said John Lietzke, 47, of Olivet, was traveling on Stine Road south of Five Point Highway responding to a fire run when the accident occurred. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

Deputies said Lietzke was the lone occupant of the vehicle and was wearing a seatbelt.

The Times-Reporter

MARTINSVILLE, Ohio — Jared W. Zimmerly, 20, son of Holmes County Sheriff Timothy W. Zimmerly, died Sunday morning after his car hit a pole and a tree and overturned in Holmes County while he was responding to an emergency call in Millersburg as a Prairie Township volunteer firefighter.

Zimmerly of County Rd. 189, Millersburg, was driving west on County Rd. 189 in Salt Creek Township, northeast of Millersburg, when he lost control of his car on a curve, according to the Wooster post of the Ohio Highway Patrol.

The car hit a pole and a tree and overturned. Zimmerly, who was not wearing his seat belt, was ejected.

WAGENER, S.C. — A volunteer firefighter was killed while trying to save someone else in Aiken County, according to officials.

The county coroner says 36-year-old Jeffrey Swartz was responding to a respiratory distress call on Camp Rawls Road in Wagener when he lost control of his SUV.

Officials say the vehicle then hit another car, flipped over and burst into flames.

COAL CITY, Ind. — A volunteer firefighter died in a car crash Monday while on her way to the department's station for a fire call, the state fire marshal said.

The firefighter was identified as Dennise M. Leslie, 37, of Freedom.

She was going to get an engine from the Coal City Fire Department to respond to a brush fire when she was killed in a single-car accident about 5 p.m., Fire Marshal Roger Johnson said.

Leslie lost control of her pickup truck as she swerved to avoid a collision with an oncoming vehicle, the Owen County Sheriff's Office said in a news release. Her truck rolled and struck a tree.

ROSHE HILL, Kan. — A volunteer with the Rose Hill Fire Department was killed late Friday when he lost control of his pickup truck while speeding to the scene of a house fire.

The Kansas Highway Patrol said Brandon Daley, 19, was thrown from his pickup after he lost control of the vehicle on Butler Road about 2 ½ miles north of Rose Hill.

Canadian fire fighter killed en route to call

Duty Death: Shawn Thomas MacLeod - [Nova Scotia]

Biographical Info

Age: 31

Cause of Death: FF Shawn Thomas MacLeod, 31, died two days before Christmas responding to his firehouse to pick up the apparatus so he could respond to a fire call. He was trying to pass another vehicle when his car struck a guard wire and rolled over several times, ejecting him. He died in hospital, leaving behind a wife and three sons, one just three weeks old. FF Mac-Leod, who was with the East River Valley FD for 15 years, was following the footsteps of his father, former Fire Chief Bert MacLeod.

"She's doing not too bad," Chief Adams said of MacLeod's widow, "but (the father, the former chief) is taking it the worst. It's his boy."

According to reports, the FF was driving fast and not wearing his seatbelt. The fire MacLeod was responding to was under control but the department was not notified and firefighters continued to respond.
-I will start by saying that I very much agree with Adam. My personal opinion is that warning lights should be reserved for official emergency vehicles and fire apparatus, and that driving of said apparatus must be allowed only after the firefighter has completed a certifying driver/operator course, something along the lines of EVOC.
-Again, my personal feeling is that, volunteer firefighters do not go through enough driver/operator training for responding code 3 in fire apparatus let alone responding to an emergency in a vehicle not designed for such driving. And issuing lights to POV's just increases liability exponentially while inadvertently encouraging reckless driving in a vehicle that is not official and not equipped to respond code 3.
-Our personnel go through an 80 hour INTENSIVE driver/operator course that includes class room time, legal responsibility, pumping an aerial operations on the drill field as well as code 1&3 street driving.
-In professional departments it is commonplace to observe firefighters ignoring the legal parameters set forth for code 3 driving. In my area, for example, code 3 driving is regulated by state law. One of the parameters is that emergency apparatus my only exceed the posted speed limit by 10 mph as the road/driving conditions allow. Permitting volunteers to drive with a courtesy light will exacerbate an already dangerous condition.
-A better approach to responses for volunteer fire depts. is what some VFD's are adopting here; bunker programs. In short, the VFD sets up a work schedule in which members sign up and commit to a tour of duty and stay in the station. Some VFD's even use some type of incentive and/or stipend for such scheduling.
-Just my opinion.

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