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How functional are your "turn-outs"? It seems that most fire departments do a great job of ensuring above standard thermal protective performance (T. P. P.) but tend to come up short in the area of functionality! The "cut", internal pocket arrangement, and external fasteners can really make you gear work for you when you need it the most!
It isn't very conducive to our own safety when we get into a "pickle" and have to dig through a pile of tools for the one we need! Firefighters come in all shapes and sizes. Our gear should match. A big "at-a-boy" goes out to my beloved C.C.F.D. for allowing each firefighter to make his or her protective ensemble WORK for them! If you are unhappy with your gear, equipment, or apparatus then get off your rear end, educate yourself, and get involved to make the change that you want to see! It doesn't happen overnight but with some persistence and perseverance it eventually can...
 

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