Fire Engineering Training Community

Where firefighters come to talk training

Why do people who spend most of their time complaining about the systems, processes, personnel, policies, and everything else remain in the fire service? 

How do you handle these people? What have you found that is effective in brining them around and jumping on board as part of the team?

Views: 328

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Paul Chief B often says "everyone complains, no one leaves" 

The only thing you can do is bring a high energy, and positive attitude. Some people just want to hate and would complain if you gave them 1 million dollars.

Do not let that person dictate your attitude, and control how you feel.

All you can do is lead by example and find a way to energize them. Every firefighter is excited when they come on the job, so I somewhat blame the service for letting people get so negative. We allow the attitude and at times we allow it to affect us. Don't let that happen!!! Come in every day and treat it with the same energy and enthusiasm as you had the first day, and you will never have a bad day.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Policy Page

CONTRIBUTORS NOTE

Our contributors' posts are not vetted by the Fire Engineering technical board, and reflect the views and opinions of the individual authors. Anyone is welcome to participate.

For vetted content, please go to www.fireengineering.com/archive/.

Fire Engineering Editor in Chief Bobby Halton
We are excited to have you participate in our discussions and interactive forums. Before you begin posting, please take a moment to read our policy page. -- Bobby Halton

Be Alert for Spam
We actively monitor the community for spam, however some does slip through. Please use common sense and caution when clicking links. If you suspect you've been hit by spam, e-mail peter.prochilo@clarionevents.com.

FE Podcasts


Check out the most recent episode and schedule of
UPCOMING PODCASTS

© 2020   Created by fireeng.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service