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My city is 54 square miles.Mostly 2 story residential, strip malls and 3-4 13 story buildings. The population is around 120,000. I'm wondering if anyone knows how I can determine the amount of engines, ladders, special units, and EMS rigs need to effecivly cover this area? If you can hook me up with links or direct me to resource so i can do research. That would be great. Thanks and stay safe.

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Bean,

There are several Chief Officers and planning types that are members of the site and I'm sure that any of them can direct you to the ISO information that you need.

Also, the site policy page that is linked in the block to the right (A message from Chief Halton) asks that all user accounts have your real name. If you could, go to your My Page tab, and change that please.

Thanks, and glad to have a new person in the knowledge base!

Larry
There are far too many variables for anyone to take the information given and give you any sort of reasonable answer. This type of thing would take a true evaluation of the size of the city, the geography, housing types, commercial/industrial prevalence and locations, years of previous run data, mutual aid potential, etc, etc. Certainly one area to look at is ISO regardless of how much we trust their system it's the one fairly consistent system in the US. There must be something in place now? Is there a problem? Are you looking to increase or downsize? Fires and fire departments are truly far too dynamic to apply some simple national matrices to figure out the answers.
-NFPA 1710 spells out this information as well as several other standards. There are also great resources from the IAFF on this.
-Something else to consider is what the community is willing to pay for and how it is "sold" to the city fathers. Having call volume numbers available at this time will also be very helpful. Unfortunately, sometimes it comes down to justifying our existence to the bean counters.
-Typically a single story residential room and contents fire will require the response of two engines, one truck and one RIC for a total of 16 firefighters at a minimum to control safely and perform all benchmarks. This is following the NFPA guidelines with the OSHA requirement. There really is no way to get around this minimum response and still do the job safely and efficiently.
Michael Bricault said:
-NFPA 1710 spells out this information as well as several other standards. There are also great resources from the IAFF on this.
-Something else to consider is what the community is willing to pay for and how it is "sold" to the city fathers. Having call volume numbers available at this time will also be very helpful. Unfortunately, sometimes it comes down to justifying our existence to the bean counters.
-Typically a single story residential room and contents fire will require the response of two engines, one truck and one RIC for a total of 16 firefighters at a minimum to control safely and perform all benchmarks. This is following the NFPA guidelines with the OSHA requirement. There really is no way to get around this minimum response and still do the job safely and efficiently.

This number doesn't include any medical sector for rehab or patient care, any managment staff or on deck FF so that you can rehab your interior crews. I've heard that 24-26 firefighters were needed for a bread and butter two story, wood frame, single family. Can't recall where though
-Agreed. 26 is the information from IAFF research data based on nationwide studies. 16 is the minimum recommended by NFPA and supported by OSHA for safe operations.

Larry Lasich said:
Michael Bricault said:
-NFPA 1710 spells out this information as well as several other standards. There are also great resources from the IAFF on this.
-Something else to consider is what the community is willing to pay for and how it is "sold" to the city fathers. Having call volume numbers available at this time will also be very helpful. Unfortunately, sometimes it comes down to justifying our existence to the bean counters.
-Typically a single story residential room and contents fire will require the response of two engines, one truck and one RIC for a total of 16 firefighters at a minimum to control safely and perform all benchmarks. This is following the NFPA guidelines with the OSHA requirement. There really is no way to get around this minimum response and still do the job safely and efficiently.

This number doesn't include any medical sector for rehab or patient care, any managment staff or on deck FF so that you can rehab your interior crews. I've heard that 24-26 firefighters were needed for a bread and butter two story, wood frame, single family. Can't recall where though
ISO Mitigation online web page has all the info you need for this question. Google ISO mitigation, it will take you to the site.

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