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What type of hook do you prefer to use. Z hook, Pike Pole....ect. I am looking to see what peoples feelings are. On our trucks we carry Pike poles and Z hooks. I prefer to use the Z hook. I just seem to have better luck with this hook versus the pike pole.

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Replies to This Discussion

Halligan hook is the most versatile
can do everything the pike pole does and more
actually the pike pole sucks in comparison
all those wierd wesat coast hooks and rake stuff like they use in boston never caught on in NJ and NY
keep it simple
halligan hook is THE tool
I have always been a roof hook (halligan hook) type of guy, but recently have grown fond of the trash rake (LA rake, arson rake). It was by accident that I was able to use one during overhaul and found it to be highly efficient in the lath and plaster construction predominately found in my district. The more I work with it the more I discover its worth. A little research in Rick Fritz's Tools of the Trade never hurts either. Most hooks are only as efficient and functional as the firefighter's understanding of it applications and limitations.
good call
u can never be too versatile
stay safe
I use a steel hook
First of all, Anthony, it's the WEST Coast not "wesat" (that is Chief for "we are always sitting") - Just kidding of course.
We use both of the hooks discussed, but not for the same operations. We use the Trash hook (LA rake, whatever) for ventilation operations. I'ts great for foot placement off of roofers that can pivot and change with cut sequences. It is also great for pull backs on skip sheeting roofs which we have alot of, it also provides a much bigger punch area vs. any other hook when punching down through the ceiling performing vertical ventilation and sounding while traveling flat roofs looking for structural members.
The All Purpose hooks/Halligan style are superior to any pike pole for sure. Around 8 years ago, our department switched to these following a demo period and have had great success. The guys love them, because they feel that they have a greater surface area for pulling down ceiling. You also have the ability to lever off of the back of the opposite side of the hook for prying off boards, trim, and siding. Even our Engine company officers are assigned this tool for interior operations while attacking the fire. They use the "D" handle to sound the floor and the all purpose hook to check overhead and vent if need be.
NY 6 foot roof hook....
I found out if used right you can open doors with it ...
NY roof hook all the way. All steal. If you use the punch method it works great.
yes the punch method works great with this tool... if used the right way the Ny hook is a great tool to have... if its a ovm tool are on the roof tool ... if you know what to do with and come up with new ways to use it you are a head of the game that gos for any tools alot of paid dept some guy make there tools... Stay safe Guys
NY roof hook- we carry them in various lengths made of the aircraft steel. We do have an ''LA Trash Hook''....we use it for pulling apart crap in dumpsters etc...its okay but we dont use it for many other things. NY Roof Hook is the way to go. You can tell a lot about a department by the quality of the tools they carry.
My favorite hook is the "dry-wall hook". I haven't got to try the "NY" roof hook out yet. My only complaint is that they cut the D-handle off the dry-wall hook so they could mount it.
so true Bruce, so true!
David

I love the Z hook with a Boston rake on the other end that works the best for me when pulling ceiling. We have 6 Ft and 3 Ft . I think the Halligan is also a grest tool also I do take that with me also most of the time. Have both tools in a hand reach. Good Discission Thanks TR

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