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Which tool do you carry and why as officer of 4 person engine company? How does this compliment your other tool assignments?

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When I'm acting as a officer on the engine the tools I carry are 6' hook, TIC, and box light. The TI and box light are clipped to my belt and the hook is easily carried. The hook can be used to take a window on the way in if needed and make inspection holes as we move through the structure. The pipe man obviously has his tool, the pipe, and the back up man brings the irons to the front door in case the next co. is delayed. The way I see it my main job is to search for the seat of the fire and keep my guys safe by making sure the fire isn't over us, but I'm open to hear any suggestions. Good post
Thanks for the input. Which style hook? Are your walls generally sheetrock, plaster, or wood? How is your tool selection effected by the consideration of emergency egress (window bailout, forcing through a wall, etc.).

Brandon Erbe said:
When I'm acting as a officer on the engine the tools I carry are 6' hook, TIC, and box light. The TI and box light are clipped to my belt and the hook is easily carried. The hook can be used to take a window on the way in if needed and make inspection holes as we move through the structure. The pipe man obviously has his tool, the pipe, and the back up man brings the irons to the front door in case the next co. is delayed. The way I see it my main job is to search for the seat of the fire and keep my guys safe by making sure the fire isn't over us, but I'm open to hear any suggestions. Good post
Hey Scott, I usually prefer what I call a roof hook, some people call them new york hook or haligan hook. It is more substantial than a regular pike pole. It is good for getting through any of those wall coverings. And it gives you an anchor point if you gotta bail.
I've considered carrying that very tool but is it difficult keeping track of a 6' tool and assisting with the line (vs. a tool you could strap to yourself)?

Brandon Erbe said:
Hey Scott, I usually prefer what I call a roof hook, some people call them new york hook or haligan hook. It is more substantial than a regular pike pole. It is good for getting through any of those wall coverings. And it gives you an anchor point if you gotta bail.
In many departments, Engine guys do not carry tools at all because they always run with Truckers or Squadmen. In my Departments, we do not have that luxury. We may be assigned as either a Truck, Engine, or Rescue. Every member knows that we ALWAYS carry tools and it has become a matter of pride for us. If we are on scene and you want to borrow one of our tools to open a wall, forget about it. We'll open the wall ourselves for you. A wise man once taught me that tools are not designed to get you into a space, their designed to get you out of one. So, as an Engine boss I carry a TIC, Box Light, and haligan. The nozzle puts a pick head in his waist strap, the back up carries a flat head(originally married to the haligan that I carry), and if not pumping, the operator follows us with a hook. If we are assigned as a Truck or Squad, our tool compliment differs slightly.
-My humble opinion is that it sounds like the engine officer would be carrying Ladder Co. tools and would therefore be thinking about and performing Truck work.
-Our engine officers may carry something like the A tool (officer tool) or maybe an ax or Halligan but that is really it. Most engine company personnel in the city don't really carry to many tools on fire ground simply because this is see as Truck Co. work.
-Some engine officers will take a box light in addition to their personal light attached to their coat. In fact, most engine officers really don't concern themselves with hand tools as it is believed that this will encourage task level work and distract from their supervisory roll. They will naturally occasionally assist with hose line advancement as needed.
-In the City of Albuquerque, the engine officers job is very well defined in the roll of an immediate supervisor of the placement and operation of the lines coming off of his engine and very, very rarely will the engine officer leave his men to perform Ladder Co functions.
-If the engine officer sees a need to perform Truck work he will advise the Ladder(s) companies what his particular needs are; ie ventilation, forcible entry, search, VES....
-I do understand that much of the tool assignment and functionality of the engine officer is based on the particular departments staffing and their experience level. And I am also aware that we are utilizing and running with a heavier staffing level then most departments. Just sharing what we do.
-Hope this helps.
KTF
good question. Is this assigned by dept? or the preference of the officer? When i was a ladder capt, i carried a set of irons and a light. That was prior to 1996 (no TICs) Now our ladder officers in NHRFR (ssigned by SOP) carry a TIC and a light as well as a set of irons The TIC and the light are on slings. We do not usually have the luxury of a 4 person company even though we cover the most congested area in the while country. I used to like to carry an A-tool for quick forcible entry if it was a thru-the lock issue (i would have the tool mounted right next to the seat. I found it more effectvie than the K-tool
The boss carries a handlight, TIC on a sling, handlight on a sling and cut down pro-bar halligan...Depending on the bldg he may take a search rope
First, I would like to say I wish I had the luxury of having a four-person company! For me as the officer it depends on the actions that we are tasked for on what I will carry. If I’m first due I will carry a 24” halligan bar, TIC, and a flashlight. If second or third due, I will carry a TIC, flashlight, and either forcible entry tools or pike pole.
Our officer (shift Lt.) rides the engine and usually gets off the rig with the TIC and a light! We don't have the luxury of 4 man rigs, the truck rider backs up the nozzleman, or becomes the nozzleman and the Officer backs him up. The Engine cheuffer is the P.O. and the Truck cheuffer handles F.E. (if needed) and setting up the aerial, 2nd due rigs take up where the voids from the initial rigs are. Anyway, I got off on a tangent, but a TIC and a light! My personal feeling is that the officer should carry some type of A Tool or Rex Tool, but I'm not the boss!
I am a Truck Officer, but when I am assigned as the Engine Officer, I carry a haligan, TIC, and box light.

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