Fire Engineering Training Community

Where firefighters come to talk training

I am sure we have all dealt with these in the past , but this what we stumbled upon a week ago, on deserted private driveway .

More and more people are doing this today. Who knows what you may come across.

Views: 598

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Very good point Mike! This would make for a long day.

Be Safe
Jeff
One good thing that could beat your finger tips is HazMatID. The drums are plastic therefore it could be corrosive materials and the leak seems to be killing the vegetation. What did you find in these drums? What response actions were taken? I would love to know more about this. Thank you Todd McKee
-One of the largest issues that keep the Glow Worms in my department busy are the clandestine meth labs. The cops bust at least one a month and then call the FD to mitigate and render safe the scene.
-Granted a a call like the photo represents some work but I wonder, is it the obvious one that is cause for alarm or is it the one that is harder to spot?
-Meth labs are everywhere, inner city, suburbia and even out in the sticks. These people disguise what they are doing to blend and that in and of itself is cause to take pause.
Do you think we could rule out this being a meth lab? I see no dis-colorization to the drums. Just a thought and could make for good discussion.

Michael Bricault said:
-One of the largest issues that keep the Glow Worms in my department busy are the clandestine meth labs. The cops bust at least one a month and then call the FD to mitigate and render safe the scene.
-Granted a a call like the photo represents some work but I wonder, is it the obvious one that is cause for alarm or is it the one that is harder to spot?
-Meth labs are everywhere, inner city, suburbia and even out in the sticks. These people disguise what they are doing to blend and that in and of itself is cause to take pause.
Brick! Glow Worms, that is great! I can use that! No offense to the Brothers that do Haz-Mat everyday. I'm ops level trained and that is more than good for me. My dept is part of our county haz-mat team, so we get plenty of practice setting up decon tents. Brick, what you said about the meth labs, I can relate to, the county I live is was # 1 in the country for meth, as a volunteer many moon ago, I almost walked into fishing line with treble hooks on it, while stretching a line at a mobile home fire that turned out to be a meth lab.
This was Waste oil , luckly I and my boss were around the corner when the FD were toned out, the police founds and stuck there fingers in it [ Nice] .
AND! THAT! IS! Why we never go any further than the first dead cop we see!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Mike France said:
This was Waste oil , luckly I and my boss were around the corner when the FD were toned out, the police founds and stuck there fingers in it [ Nice] .
YOU ARE NOT KIDDING, bunch of nitwits , the officers not only stuck his finger in it he smelled it.
Todd, very true statement my friend, nothing like a blue canary.
A couple of thoughts on this incident and the comments.

First, rather than "blue canary," the latest term is "copological indicator."

Second, it's important that fire departments not get in the business of handling and managing other people's waste. Anything beyond the required mitigation of the incident can lead to some significant legal issues and fines.

Once a material has been identified as a waste, it has to be characterized. If it's determined to be hazardous waste (as defined by the feds) either because of toxicity, reactivity, flammability or corrosivity or because it's a listed waste, there is a whole raft of regulations that kick into place.

Suffice it to say that fire departments don't want to be in the business of packaging, transporting, or especially improperly disposing of haz waste (such as in the dumpster behind the station). Putting a label on drums/barrels that advises the contents are awaiting disposal pending analysis may be as far as the responding agencies are able to go without running into potentially significant liability.
Here's how it was handled , We [ EMO] and the Fire Department made one call to NYS DEC Spill responce they arrived within 10 mins they are right down the road , they called in a private compnay at the expense of the Property Owner [ which information came from the Town., We get called for this all the time and inturn we call the State .
Good Stuff!

Mike France said:
Here's how it was handled , We [ EMO] and the Fire Department made one call to NYS DEC Spill responce they arrived within 10 mins they are right down the road , they called in a private compnay at the expense of the Property Owner [ which information came from the Town., We get called for this all the time and inturn we call the State .

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Policy Page

PLEASE NOTE

The login above DOES NOT provide access to Fire Engineering magazine archives. Please go here for our archives.

CONTRIBUTORS NOTE

Our contributors' posts are not vetted by the Fire Engineering technical board, and reflect the views and opinions of the individual authors. Anyone is welcome to participate.

For vetted content, please go to www.fireengineering.com/issues.

Fire Engineering Editor in Chief Bobby Halton
We are excited to have you participate in our discussions and interactive forums. Before you begin posting, please take a moment to read our policy page. -- Bobby Halton

Be Alert for Spam
We actively monitor the community for spam, however some does slip through. Please use common sense and caution when clicking links. If you suspect you've been hit by spam, e-mail peter.prochilo@clarionevents.com.

FE Podcasts


Check out the most recent episode and schedule of
UPCOMING PODCASTS

© 2022   Created by fireeng.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service