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Does anybody have any tips/tactics reguarding the job of the FF/Officer that backs up the nozzleman while advancing and or operating the hoseline?

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What specifically do you want to know?

Here are my basics:
1. Make sure a 360 is done prior to making an interior attack.(read smoke, fire conditions, and get rescue information)
2. Choose the right size pre-connect.(that goes for length and diameter)
3. Bring all of your tools.(for me it's TIC, light, haligan, and radio.....which all hang....my hands are free)
4. Before entering structure I check the attic at the doorway w/pike pole...if safe enter...if not extinguish above before entering.
5. Hose management. My driver kicks the kinks out of line and manages the hose around cars, bushes, poles, etcetera. I manage the hose at the doorway which secures it from closing on the hose. After about 10-12 feet of hose has entered structure I go in and assist the nozzle firefighter. The driver then steps up and manages the hose from the doorway. I then back-up the firefighter and help him advance more hose around corners or position for extinguishment.
6. Extinguish the fire and communicate conditions on radio.
7. Retreat with hose the same way I entered around corners and at doorway.

I hope this helps.
What you said was very informational, but what I am looking for is ways to take the load off of the nozzleman while advancing the charged line. Thank you for your input.
On our dept ,we do back up the nozzleman,because that is and lot of pressure going though the hoses. And the nozzleman get very tired the back up is in front.,A third fire fighter comes over to take the place of the first nozzelman. That is teamwork.I hope that makes since. I guess every dept has there own ways.
In navy a man is right behind nozzle man with one hand on hose and other hand bracing the nozzle man, this was also true for Moores mill vfd and the Gurley vfd when I was with them and enough personnel was available if not one was ssome time told to circle hose on ground an have nozzle go under where hose crossess and sit on it and fight defensively.
Tie the ends of a rope together (rope approx 8ft, adjust for your size), loop around the hose line, place the rope over your shoulder that is opposite of the hose line and lean into it. The rope transfers the force of the line to your shoulder. I believe you’ll find that this will relieve early fatigue. Store rope in you gear for the next time.

Mike J.
Here is one way that a back-up man can take pressure of the pipeman:

The back-up can be about an arm and a half length behind the pipeman with the knee closest to the hose up, supporting the hose. Grab the hose with the arm closest to the hose and run the hose under that arm pit. Put the elbow of the hose arm against your inner thigh. Outstretch the other arm and grab the hose near the pipeman, now slightly lean forward.
This is what I am looking for. Any other information from any other members is much appreciated.

Gregory

Chris Piepenburg said:
Here is one way that a back-up man can take pressure of the pipeman:

The back-up can be about an arm and a half length behind the pipeman with the knee closest to the hose up, supporting the hose. Grab the hose with the arm closest to the hose and run the hose under that arm pit. Put the elbow of the hose arm against your inner thigh. Outstretch the other arm and grab the hose near the pipeman, now slightly lean forward.
Rodger Jerome Beam said:
In navy a man is right behind nozzle man with one hand on hose and other hand bracing the nozzle man, this was also true for Moores mill vfd and the Gurley vfd when I was with them and enough personnel was available if not one was ssome time told to circle hose on ground an have nozzle go under where hose crossess and sit on it and fight defensively.
I agree with you Navy man,about the back up of the nozzle man ,one hand on the nozzle man shoulder or,and on the hose. Are the sitting down position.circle of hose. Best way i can put this.
It really depends on your staffing, and the line size. A 1 3/4 line shouldn't need a guy backing up the nozzleman, I think it is much more important to have him feeding line. It'd be nice if we all had FDNY's staffing, but most of us have to punt. My department usually has 3 man engines, so a first in engine to an offensive fire has one guy at the nozzle, the driver pumping, and the officer checking ceiling, monitoring conditions, and pulling hose. Not optimum for sure, but all we got. I have my driver keep the pressure on the low end so we can advance the line around turns, then call for more pressure once we find the fire, if necessary. The few days that I've had one extra guy at a fire, gave a disproportionate difference. I still don't use him to back up the nozzle man if it is a 1 3/4 line, a 2 1/2 for sure, but not a smaller line.

Bryan Lafleur
"There is too much tact and not enough courage in today's American society". Gene Duncan, USMC ret'd.
Gregory Banks said:
What you said was very informational, but what I am looking for is ways to take the load off of the nozzleman while advancing the charged line. Thank you for your input.

OK.....now I understand what you're looking for. As I mentioned before having the back-up firefighter set up the the corners and advance the hose to the nozzle firefighter is the best way to advance the hose to the seat of the fire. This method helps take the load off of the nozzle firefighter and avoids the common coupling catch/tie up under doorways, under car tires, in bushes, at corners, etcetera. Once you're at the doorway and ready to flow water the best way to take the load off of the nozzle firefighter is the Seattle Lock. If you need more explanation send me an e-mail. I have a basic and advanced hose management class that I teach and I might be able to send you part of it that discuss this in greater detail.

Here's more on the Seattle Lock if you've never seen it before:

http://www.firenuggets.com/x_ARDSIllIIlllllIIIllIlIlIIIllllIllIl/au...

Good luck bro.

Jason
Thanks Jason, I would really like to see the info that you have. My e-mail is bowmanc14@hotmail.com.

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