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I am looking for pre trip or any inspections for engines. Trying to update our current process.

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In the Kewaskum Fire department, we use a standard checklist style inspection sheet. We run routine inspections bi-monthly. We go through all the vehicle fluid levels, check tires, warning lights, siren, and radio system. The pump is exercised as well. With the pump drained, and not engaged, the valves are exercised. The pump is engaged and set to recirculate. The drip rated is checked, and the primer is exercised, and primer fluid is checked/added. If you are in a metro department that doesn't draft, it is very important to exercise the primer to keep it from burning out, or stuck if ever needed. All of the equipment on the vehicle is inspected and run as well. If the vehicle is less than 75% full of fuel, it is refueled. As is all of the small engine equipment run.

As far a pre-trips go, our HEO's only have a few things to do. In winter, the drains are left open in the firehouse, so the first thing the HEO will do is start the engine, close the drains, and check for open doors, or anything obviously out of the ordinary, ie, flat tire, etc.

We are luck that in our combination department, that we have members who are handy with maintainance. We have a member who is a diesel mechanic, so he can fix mostly any problem we run into, and every truck gets preventative maintainance, (oil change, complete filter change, chassis inspection, and every hinge, and moving part is lubricated.), once a year whether it reached it's mileage limit or not.

For pre-trip
Jeff do you have a copy of your inspection form for me.

Jeff Buechel said:
In the Kewaskum Fire department, we use a standard checklist style inspection sheet. We run routine inspections bi-monthly. We go through all the vehicle fluid levels, check tires, warning lights, siren, and radio system. The pump is exercised as well. With the pump drained, and not engaged, the valves are exercised. The pump is engaged and set to recirculate. The drip rated is checked, and the primer is exercised, and primer fluid is checked/added. If you are in a metro department that doesn't draft, it is very important to exercise the primer to keep it from burning out, or stuck if ever needed. All of the equipment on the vehicle is inspected and run as well. If the vehicle is less than 75% full of fuel, it is refueled. As is all of the small engine equipment run.

As far a pre-trips go, our HEO's only have a few things to do. In winter, the drains are left open in the firehouse, so the first thing the HEO will do is start the engine, close the drains, and check for open doors, or anything obviously out of the ordinary, ie, flat tire, etc.

We are luck that in our combination department, that we have members who are handy with maintainance. We have a member who is a diesel mechanic, so he can fix mostly any problem we run into, and every truck gets preventative maintainance, (oil change, complete filter change, chassis inspection, and every hinge, and moving part is lubricated.), once a year whether it reached it's mileage limit or not.

For pre-trip
I have started using the State of MO CDL pre-trip inspection. It's long, however we a re driving a big truck. It's the same inspection used for tractor trailers. I decided to go this route after having apparatus in service with broken springs and shackles and drivers don't catch it. I'm sure every state offers some sort of pre-trip inspection list.
Hey Tom, I attached some of the procedures and forms we use. They are by no means perfect, but they may get you in the right direction. The procedures are taken from a conglomeration of manuals and other manufacturer publications for the equipment we use(pierce, waterous, holmatro...) Anyway, our form is kind of generic, obviously we only fill out the applicable parts for whatever piece of equipment we are checking. Another reason we have gone with the procedure form, is that we are slowly transitioning into entering our truck check info into firehouse software, so if we have a procedure set, when its entered into firehouse that the truck was checked...those things should have been completed first. Again, its a work in progress, but if its any help to you, then great.
Attachments:
I would start with your states CDL manual and the pre-trip requirements there. Think about also running pump, checking discharge gauges, relief and intake valves, and flowing all discharges. Checking all equipment and running all motors and equipment (generators, fans ect.). You can divide this into daily checks and weekly checks..
Thanks for the help will take your advice .Have a safe one take care.

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