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Semantics, Truck? or Ladder? What's in a name?

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-Rick
I know some will say that it doesn't matter, or others will tell you that a ladder is a thing to climb on while a Truck is something to ride on.
-The simple fact of the matter is that the oldest departments in the country always called their "Trucks" Ladder Companies using a numeric designation; i.e. Ladder Company No. 5.
-Referring to a ladder company as a truck is like referring to an engine company as a pumper.
-Stay safe.
But they do! They call them all trucks, parked in the truck bay!
Michael Bricault said:
-Rick
I know some will say that it doesn't matter, or others will tell you that a ladder is a thing to climb on while a Truck is something to ride on.
-The simple fact of the matter is that the oldest departments in the country always called their "Trucks" Ladder Companies using a numeric designation; i.e. Ladder Company No. 5.
-Referring to a ladder company as a truck is like referring to an engine company as a pumper.
-Stay safe.
Well it seems that the term Ladder refers to the company. Truck refers to the actual piece. A truckie is the guy who rides it. Truckwork is everything other than opening a bale and spraying water. For instance 4 Truck is housed at Ladder 4 on 8th Ave. I've also heard it refered to as the Ladder Truck. Which is technically what it is. A truck that carries an aerial device and ground ladders. Now for the semantics......Tower Ladder, ladder tower or straight stick aerial? LOL! The only real differentiation should be that Engines carry water and hose....Trucks carry ladders and men.
-LOL. Chuck said, "The only real differentiation should be that Engines carry water and hose....Trucks carry ladders and men."
-Chuck, you didn't finish the statement.
-The only real differentiation should be that Engines carry water and hose....Trucks do everything else.
-Couldn't resist. hahaha
_Stay safe
"The only real differentiation should be that Engines carry water and hose....Trucks carry ladders and men." This is a beautiful statement and one that I am going to use with your permission.(especially when I'm cross training the "nozzle heads" in truck ops). Thanks
I don't know if that can be attributed to me, LOL, but that's what this site is all about! Brothers helping brothers! So use it at will! LOL! Don't give away too many secrets to the nozzle heads....they might go thinking that they can really do truck work. Happy Holidays and stay safe!
What a fun discussion! I guess I really do not have a solid perspective on this issue, due to the fact I work on a 3 engine and 1 heavy rescue department. We use auto aid for our two first due aerials. Now with that said I guess I tend to question the naming of our first due aerials. One is a 105' platform that they call Quint 41. The second is a 75' (more like a quint) stick they call Truck 10.It seems to me that the individual departments, at least around here, tend to name the apps. according to what they think sounds neat. In my experience Trucks are without water and work all the tradtional truckie jobs. That is anything but hose bunny work. Ladders are aerials capable of being self supportive and attack fire. Quints are aerials 25' short from getting to the roof and 400 gallons short of putting out a fire, generally staffed by very confused firefighters! Just kidding to all the Q riders out there.
Thanks,
Marty
I think this is mostly a point of historical interest or pride but...

In Seattle we have had Ladder Companies, Truck Companies, and Water Tower Companies. These terms describe different apparatus all of which are staffed by a full struength company of truckmen.

A Ladder Company is a support company equiped with a aerial ladder.

A Water Tower Company is a suport company equiped with an elivating master stream (similar to a modern snorkle)

A Truck Company is a suport company which has a full complement of ground ladders and equipment but no aerial device. This is not the same as a Squad Company (manpower) or a Rescue Company (Technical abilities/FF Rescue)

And there is occational discusion of getting a Ladder Tower Company (Basket on an Aerial) or Tower Ladder Company (Basket on a Boom)

The primary operational value I see to these designations (besides PRIDE and TRADITION) is to allow personel to know the different capabilities of various companies in large systems with a large number of apparatus.

Tom Hofland
Ladder Company 4
What's the difference between a truck and an engine?


Answer: a truck drips oil while an engine drips water!
That's the way it marks its territory! ........Kind of like the alpha male in the relationship!
And we had to clean up after it!

Chuck Fager said:
That's the way it marks its territory! ........Kind of like the alpha male in the relationship!

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