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On the FE site: Important NIOSH report, Quick vote...

Be sure to read the recently released NIOSH report on certain types of aerials by clicking here: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/fire/SafetyAdvisory05052008.html. The report concerns safety issues with aerial ladder trucks with locking (pin-anchored, lever actuated, clamped) waterways.

Also, we're always looking for new Quick Vote questions to post on the homepage of the Fire Engineering site. Quick Votes are those poll questions you see on the lefthand side of fireengineering.com. They're an interesting way to gauge reactions on fire service issues. If you've got a question you want to see up there, e-mail it to peterp@pennwell.com with "Quick Vote" in the subject line.

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Comment by Bill Peters on May 9, 2008 at 11:01am
The aerial in this case was transported pinned to the 2nd secton, thus leaving the tip clear for rescue. The pin was removed at the scene when the ladder was bedded and was supposed to be reinserted in the tip mode for water tower operations.
The aerial was raised by another member who was unaware that the pin was supposed to have been changed. The waterway stayed at the 2nd section. When it was charged, it became a big hydraulic piston and shot the whole monitor and last section of pipe out the end of the ladder, fatally injuring the Deputy Chief.
Comment by Tom Slater on May 9, 2008 at 10:39am
The article said that the aerial was transported in the rescue mode and I am wondering if the waterway was charged when still in this position? It did not say if the control was switched to water before it was pressurized. Should the control not be in the rescue position when operating the aerial to prevent something like this happening? It cannot "launch" out if it is already at the tip. At our department the aerial is always bedded in the waterway position and when used for rescue the operator would walk the end of the aerial to switch the control before raising.

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