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Elevator Rescue

The emergency removal of victims from elevator emergencies can be a time consuming, and labor intensive event. When fire fighters work around any machinery, all actions must be well thought out and deliberate. Precautions must be taken to ensure the safety of both the victim, rescuers and by-standers.

During this session the Fort Buchanan Fire Department simulated that a elevator maintenance personnel felled from a considered distance on top of the elevator cart while doing work; the victim was conscious, breathing but had a broken leg, both arms, and lots of pain on the lower back area.

The need for effective administration of technical rescue, and emergency medical services was imminent. Initial assessment was performed, and other agencies were summoned (EMS, elevator service, police, mutual aid, etc.)
Lock-out/tag-out procedures were the first countermeasure taken for the victim’s, and rescue safety. Action plan, victim contact, and role assignment followed the initial steps. Life lines (NFPA type G) and harnesses were employed in addition to full protective rescue ensemble to make certain that no rescuer felled down an elevator hoist way. Mechanical advantage systems (5:1), belay, access to shaft (12' folding ladder, victim packaging, and recovery were the most intense section of the training.
The end result: Each one of the personnel on site played a vital role during the training session, making the final objective achievable.

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