Fire Engineering Training Community

Where firefighters come to talk training

How should the attack line be held while advancing/operating at an offensive based fire? Should the pistol grip be used if line is equipped with one?

Views: 336

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

The pistol grip is another tool in the box. It is appropriate at some times and not at others. If you are crawling interior it is probably easier just to grab the hoseline. If you grab the pistol grip the hoseline should be in your armpit your arm should be outstretched, not on your hip like the high noon gunfighter, and the other hand should be on the shutoff. You can really save some energy if you are outside or doing overhaul and have the line over your shoulder. It takes less effort to lock out one arm, let the pistol grip rest in the web between thumb and forefinger and use the other hand to control the shutoff.
I use the nozzle to find possible holes in the floor while I'm crawling so I don't want to hold the nozzle. I do understand what you are saying and you do make a point with holding it out in front. The majority of the firefighters I've worked with hold the pistol grip and they end up shooting from the hip, almost everytime.
The technique of not using a handle on a nozzle is a great way to operate, but I must agree that handles are just another tool in the toolbox. We have hand lines with and with out handles. There are uses for them so train using both applications.
Thanks
I feel that pistol grips are a hindrance to hose deployment. While they can help to move the hose most firefighters forget to let go and get that nozzle out in front of them when it comes down to crunch time. While training is helpful, we cannot duplicate the stresses and events encountered in real life situations.
We do not have any pistol grips on any of our lines. We have never had a problem, that I am aware of, with hose deployment or use on any fire scene.
"I use the nozzle to find possible holes in the floor while I'm crawling so I don't want to hold the nozzle." Reply by Larry Glover on August 20, 2009 at 7:44pm
We teach total control of the nozzle at all times. That nozzle should NEVER be out of your hand until you are flowing water! It is too easy to hit the bail and "accidentally" open it steaming yourself and others.
Let me clearify, that I hold the hoseline right behind the nozzle at the coupling. I don't hold the nozzle (around the bail-behind the head) due to the fact of the gpm selector ring. I've acidentially changed my gpm's without knowing it. I've been taught to hold right behind the coupling.

Robert Homman said:
I feel that pistol grips are a hindrance to hose deployment. While they can help to move the hose most firefighters forget to let go and get that nozzle out in front of them when it comes down to crunch time. While training is helpful, we cannot duplicate the stresses and events encountered in real life situations.
We do not have any pistol grips on any of our lines. We have never had a problem, that I am aware of, with hose deployment or use on any fire scene.
"I use the nozzle to find possible holes in the floor while I'm crawling so I don't want to hold the nozzle." Reply by Larry Glover on August 20, 2009 at 7:44pm
We teach total control of the nozzle at all times. That nozzle should NEVER be out of your hand until you are flowing water! It is too easy to hit the bail and "accidentally" open it steaming yourself and others.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Policy Page

CONTRIBUTORS NOTE

Our contributors' posts are not vetted by the Fire Engineering technical board, and reflect the views and opinions of the individual authors. Anyone is welcome to participate.

For vetted content, please go to www.fireengineering.com/archive/.

Fire Engineering Editor in Chief Bobby Halton
We are excited to have you participate in our discussions and interactive forums. Before you begin posting, please take a moment to read our policy page. -- Bobby Halton

Be Alert for Spam
We actively monitor the community for spam, however some does slip through. Please use common sense and caution when clicking links. If you suspect you've been hit by spam, e-mail peter.prochilo@clarionevents.com.

FE Podcasts


Check out the most recent episode and schedule of
UPCOMING PODCASTS

© 2020   Created by fireeng.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service