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A co-worker showed me a homemade door hinge tool that he used to keep a door open. It was made out of a piece of angle iron and a hook that you simply would hang over the hinge. I liked the tool, but it seemed a little too bulky to stuff in a pocket, so I tried to make one similar but not as bulky. I attached some pictures.

Pete

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Don't waste your time with the door hinge tool, stick with the plain old, multi use, highly versatile old fashion wooden door chock. They work the best and are easy to make and/or obtain.
How much silverdine do you think you will need, after standing up at a good fire, to use that? Stick with the old fashion wood door chock
bobby g
Don't get me wrong, I'm not knocking the wooden door wedge. I keep one in my turnouts as well, but I've seen many wooden wedges get dislodged by somebody walking or crawling or dragging a hose through the door. Next thing you know, the door closes behind you and you just lost another door wedge. If I'm crawling in, I just slip the "door hinge tool" over the bottom hinge. It keeps the door wide open and I don't have to worry about it becoming dislodged. It's just another option. I handed some out at work and I got some good feedback from my co-workers, so I thought I would just put it out there for other departments to see and possibly try.
Remember, we should only be chocking doors if a line goes through the door opening. If we don't have a line we should close the door conduct the search and vent. If when we return to the door the line is in place we can chock the door to aid in ventalation.
Sorry Frank I disagree. I was taught if you go in then chock the door. If something happens you can get right out. It never failed me, not once. The last thing you need to be doing is looking for the door knob while Mr. Fire is chasing your a** out of the room you were just searching. Take it a step further, if your going in the window, make it a door, take everything out, glass, frame, everything.

Remember, we should only be chocking doors if a line goes through the door opening. If we don't have a line we should close the door conduct the search and vent. If when we return to the door the line is in place we can chock the door to aid in ventalation.
I have to agree with Robert. We have doors that can lock once we go through. Chock the door to prevent being locked in or out. Wooden wedges work great but sometimes you have to go through a lot of doors and if you can carry a few more chocks without bulk go for it.

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