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Does anyone hang the 3 inch down the stairwell for a 3-4 story stretch? My gut says that the combination of pressure inside the hose and weight would cause the couplings to fail.
Am I wrong here? Are there times when you would want to hang it over the railing?

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We have many 3 or 4 story buildings in our first in area that have outside or balcony entrances, we have used our hi-rise packs and deployed over the stair rail with either 1 3/4" or 2 1/2" hose, or hoist lines up using a drop rope. We use hose chains or webbing to secure the hose, if you make sure that your hose is secured below a coupling there is no stress placed on the coupling. Stretching over the railing is quicker and easier than trying to wrap around stairwells up 3 or 4 floors and fighting the potential kinks and friction of the corners.
Support each coupling with a piece of webbing, rope or a hose strap, and you should have no problems with any vertical stretch. If you are use 50' length of hose up a 3-4 story stairwell, you should only have one coupling to support. Flake it in dry, get all excess hose above and support it at any coupling and secure it at the top.
Bro
Three inch is a lot of weight. I don't have problems with the couplings as much as I would have with older constructed buildings. The banisters or the newel posts may not hold up well, if they are made of wood construction.. If you have a well h*** large enough to pass a hoseline, don't even take the time to use 3 ". You can stretch other hoselines, a primary and backup, alot faster than using the 3" and gated wyes. Your guys will need to practice this, as it is not an every day stretch.
The problem is that the required EP for the lay is more than 250 psig. The hallway is more than 400 feet and we have a 75 psi 125 gpm nozzle. Yes, I cringe also, but that's what the leadership team wants.

Russ Chapman said:
Bro
Three inch is a lot of weight. I don't have problems with the couplings as much as I would have with older constructed buildings. The banisters or the newel posts may not hold up well, if they are made of wood construction.. If you have a well h*** large enough to pass a hoseline, don't even take the time to use 3 ". You can stretch other hoselines, a primary and backup, alot faster than using the 3" and gated wyes. Your guys will need to practice this, as it is not an every day stretch.
Dave LeBlanc said:
Why not just use 2 1/2 instead of reducing it down? Or like the brother said, pull 2 1 3/4 lines separately. We are using a 50psi, 180gpm breakapart nozzle on our 1 3/4 lines. More flow, less pressure. Almost like lite beer.

All great ideas and I have tried to point them out. The replies are (and I'm paraphrasing), 2 and 1/2 inch lines are little supply lines (it's too much work to advance them) and smooth bores are only for CAFS. The more I ask about this, the longer my head gets held under. Breathing has become more important than winning.
Dave LeBlanc said:
Smoothbores are only for CAFS......I have beer coming out of my nose. I am pretty sure smoothbores came first. Yes it can be difficult to advance a 2 1/2 with reduced manpower, but stretching a 3 inch line up a stairwell and then setting up the wye can't be that much easier.

It sounds like you have to work within the system you are given, like the rest of us. So if it must be three inch, then you should be all set assuming you support the couplings as described.

Larry Lasich said:
Dave LeBlanc said:
Why not just use 2 1/2 instead of reducing it down? Or like the brother said, pull 2 1 3/4 lines separately. We are using a 50psi, 180gpm breakapart nozzle on our 1 3/4 lines. More flow, less pressure. Almost like lite beer.

All great ideas and I have tried to point them out. The replies are (and I'm paraphrasing), 2 and 1/2 inch lines are little supply lines (it's too much work to advance them) and smooth bores are only for CAFS. The more I ask about this, the longer my head gets held under. Breathing has become more important than winning.

That reply came from the A shift Capt. I asked when we could put smooth stack tips on the high-rise packs and without a pause, that was the answer that he threw back at me. Directing him to Lt McCormick would have been seen as a "smart a** response" so I dropped it.
Sounds like you are fighting an uphill battle Brother! I feel for you and wish you luck.
I am a big believer that all rigs should have at least one static hosebed off the rear. A great set up is the FDNY bed of 6 lengths of 1 3/4" over 12 of 2 1/2". Now the friction loss is negated, there are no gated wyes to contend with, and the stretch is easier. No doubt, a stairwell stretch is a 2 engine company stretch, something the powers to be cannot fathom. They think eveything is done with 2 guys! I would like to meet the idiot who said 1 3/4" was a one man hoseline!

Larry Lasich said:
The problem is that the required EP for the lay is more than 250 psig. The hallway is more than 400 feet and we have a 75 psi 125 gpm nozzle. Yes, I cringe also, but that's what the leadership team wants.

Russ Chapman said:
Bro
Three inch is a lot of weight. I don't have problems with the couplings as much as I would have with older constructed buildings. The banisters or the newel posts may not hold up well, if they are made of wood construction.. If you have a well h*** large enough to pass a hoseline, don't even take the time to use 3 ". You can stretch other hoselines, a primary and backup, alot faster than using the 3" and gated wyes. Your guys will need to practice this, as it is not an every day stretch.
Bro don't waste good beer!

Dave LeBlanc said:
Smoothbores are only for CAFS......I have beer coming out of my nose. I am pretty sure smoothbores came first. Yes it can be difficult to advance a 2 1/2 with reduced manpower, but stretching a 3 inch line up a stairwell and then setting up the wye can't be that much easier.

It sounds like you have to work within the system you are given, like the rest of us. So if it must be three inch, then you should be all set assuming you support the couplings as described.

Larry Lasich said:
Dave LeBlanc said:
Why not just use 2 1/2 instead of reducing it down? Or like the brother said, pull 2 1 3/4 lines separately. We are using a 50psi, 180gpm breakapart nozzle on our 1 3/4 lines. More flow, less pressure. Almost like lite beer.

All great ideas and I have tried to point them out. The replies are (and I'm paraphrasing), 2 and 1/2 inch lines are little supply lines (it's too much work to advance them) and smooth bores are only for CAFS. The more I ask about this, the longer my head gets held under. Breathing has become more important than winning.

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