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My Department wants to get some good vent training material together. They want to teach it next month and I said I would help out, Does anyone know of some good material for this training or what does your Department do for there vent trainings.

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We built a few props. One was a flat roof where we used 2x12 and plywood for the deck. A layer of tar paper and shingles. It was about 10x10. This gave firefighters the feel for cutting and making sure they dident cut rafters. We were also able to work on having a back-up man using our SOG's back slaps for starting and stoping cuts. The best method it to get a vacant house to work on but I know how rare that is.
Hey JJ, I just have to let you know, we are doing vent training at AFD this month. So far, we have cut on the old buildings next to the new city hall, and our shift is doing cutting Thursday at the old mainstream, which is coming down soon. Hands on stuff on acquired city owned buildings has increased for us the last couple years, and it rocks. I will try to keep that kind of thing in mind next time, and maybe we can get you guys in for some joint drills. Our biggest problem is short time-lines to get in and out of these places, but we can try.
I've been trying to get one built out of steel for the main frame work and then put wood inside for rafters. If you have the plans I would like to see them.
Nate Skewes said:
We built a few props. One was a flat roof where we used 2x12 and plywood for the deck. A layer of tar paper and shingles. It was about 10x10. This gave firefighters the feel for cutting and making sure they dident cut rafters. We were also able to work on having a back-up man using our SOG's back slaps for starting and stoping cuts. The best method it to get a vacant house to work on but I know how rare that is.
You can always just start out with pallets on the ground and having them topped off with a piece of OSB or plywood. That wya it's cheap and this allows the Firefighters to get used to going up and over the rafter (2x4 on the Pallet) before they get up on a roof. Plus I'm a firm believer that you need to get used to operating a chain saw by using it a lot. I have over 10 yrs experince using a saw from an off duty job, where I used a chain saw several days a week cutting trees and brush. Using the pallets down on the ground it gives the FF a feel on how the saw handles and how to change your hands around and how to move with the saw. If you can build a prop or get some old buildings that you can cut on that is always the best way to train.
You should contact Chandler Fire Dept and speak to Capt Tom Shaw...several years ago i attended AZ State Fire School and took the Ladder Company Functions Class. The ladder guys from Chandler Fire Dept and Mesa Fire Dept really were on top of their game...he may or may not remember me but it never hurts to ask...i have his contact info if you wish...email me at fcanez@northwestfire.org
Mr Blaker, This reply may be too late for your post and any vent training you may have done. But I just wanted to tell you about a tool that you might find interesting for vent training. You can see it at www.safefireladderstep.com. Some techniques today just arent safe, take a look and tell me what you think. Thanks.
JJ ,
We have built some props (don't have plans though). There are some pics and a video that i have posted. Take a look.

Ian
-It depends on what you're looking for. Are you trying to put together a powerpoint presentation, lecture, or are you interested in building props to cut on?
-If you are more interested in props I will tell you that our academy built two permanent, very substantial props out of steel that have replaceable wood decking. The props are also high enough that they require a ladder to get on to so as to recreate the entire experience for the firefighters.
-Good, substantial, safe (crucial) props take time and money to build. Wood is a quick inexpensive answer for the frame but it won't last long. Steel is safer and will last as well as stand up to abuse.
-Powerpoint presentations are available from many companies who may even supply an instructor that can teach some of the advanced techniques.

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