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I have found that using pruning shears work much better than conventional wire cutters. They are spring opening and have wide gap to get on the wires easy. Normal shears will cut a 3/4 " to 1' limb.
I went to the local hardware store and found the Fiskar brand ones work very well, they have an internal spring and a thumb release. These are really easy to use with structural gloves and cut wires & cables really easy.

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Nice to know, sounds like they would work well in a RIT bag also. Does anyone else in the area use them or did you find them on your own? I need a new pair of wire cutters, Thanks
A Captain in our dept. had a pair, but they were of the type with the spring exposed. This spring popped off on me during scba maze drills, so I went back to the store and found the Fiskar brand with the internal spring. I have used them several more times in the maze w/o any problems. I also have used them on battery cables and other larger diameter things that needed cutting.
I like to carry a pair of 10 inch cable cutters; they are blunt end to keep from stabbing myself in the leg if I fall on them. What else do you carry? I had a pair of channel lock pliers. I don’t know if I’m going to replace them. Everything else I carry is pretty much the norm I think chocks webbing and 2 large carabineers.
Great Idea, I've been trying to find something spring loaded that can operate easily with gloves on this sounds like something to try out. Thanks for the info!
I found a pair of 7" cutters that are spring loaded at Lowe's. I believe they are Kobalt. They have a little locking mechanism that keeps them closed but it is not hard to unlock them with a glove hand. Great idea on the pruning shears. I'll try those out also.
Here is a photo attached of the pair I carry, the internal spring won't pop off like the external type.
Attachments:
I tried my Fiskars shears with a few different gauge wire and they just spread a little causing the wire to just bend. The spring feature mentioned did intrigue me though. Went to Home Depot and found Channel lock cutters, spring loaded (about $21 and made in the USA). Put a rubberband on the end to keep them closed until I need them. Perfect length to fit in my radio pocket making them alot easier to reach than the bellow pockets. All tips I'm picking up from everybody here, thanks!
Isn't Home Depot just an incredible place!
Yes it is Ricky! The shears I have are concidered by-pass cutters, not sure if that was the problem or not. Attached is a pic from Channel lock website on the pair I have now
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I carry a set of 'Stanley' Tin-snips. They don't open as wide as the shears that have been mentioned in the previous posts, however, they are designed for metal.
After putting some thought into this, it would also be difficult to get both a wire and my airline in these snips in the darkness...an option I like!
Stay safe
I have found that these work pretty well and the blades are replaceable. I am able to cut most wires and soft goods with ease. However I am unable to cut drop-ceiling track with them.

http://www.amazon.com/Gerber-22-00521-Superknife-Ultra-Shear/dp/B00...
Don, I am a high voltage power lineman and I carry a pair of Kline linemans pliers in my turnout gear. They do have the spring in the handle and are almost indestructable. I use them at work to cut steel strands on guy wire. But if you are looking for something to cut soft drawn like battery cables at car crashes or household wiring look into greenlee hand tools they make a ratching cable cutter that you can cut pretty large wire with by useing just one hand. They work well for tight spots.
Stay Safe. Chris W.F.D.

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