Fire Engineering Training Community

Where firefighters come to talk training

This is the 50th thread for the Start Water group. No other group has as many topics or responses.

Views: 189

Replies to This Discussion

Good topic...hmm, let's see...
1) Never stop learning. Being on the Engine is more than just spraying water. There is something new to learn about your crew, your engine, your equipment, and your district every day.
2) Know what line to pull and when to pull it and where to put it.
3) Don't touch the pistol grip:)
4) Don't overcrowd the hoseline...work the friction points. If you aren't on the nozzle, get over it.
5) Kinks can kill...be vigilant for them and get rid of them.
6) Do everything you can to make the first line hit the mark effectively; then pull the backup line.
7) Don't eat any more than your mask will hold.
Ray,
Here are some things that I picked up over the years:

1) Know your Building Construction
2) Be knowledgeable in Fire Behavior (Smoke reading is essential)
3) Know every piece of equipment on the engine, and train on it every shift/day
4) Know what lines to pull (i.e. lengths, diameter, etc..)
5) Know what your gear can, and can't do. Also carry equipment you know you'll need. Everyone goes in with a tool.
5) Train, train, train!
Know your area
Know your rig
Know your crew and who's coming to assist
Know building construction
Know fire behavior
Know your depts. SOP's/SOG's
Know that you will learn something new today
My Top 10

1) Know your apparatus and the equipment it carries..
2) Know your Pump and Hydraulics
3) Know your district (Building Construction) and placement for the Engine.
4) Know what line(s) to pull if assigned to nozzle.
5) Know how to use the nozzle and that hose wont work if Kinked...
6) Know your crew. The good and bad and the ugly (This includes incoming Companies)
7) Hit it hard and fast with the RIGHT tools.
8) Know fire behaviour.
9) And if theres something you dont know ask then Train on it till you do know it.
10) Know that speed and not wearing your seat belt wont allow you to be on a Engine anymore if you dont arrive alive.
1. 2nd due is always the 1st helpers on the initial line. No second line goes in service until the first in in place and moving well

2. Don't pencil. If you have fire or extreme heat and smoke, OPEN the line and flow until conditions improve.

3. Don't get too far up the nozzleman behind as a back-up. Give them the space they need to operate the line with ease.

4. DON'T FORGET to sweep the floor before advancing.

5. If you don't have truckies, always be sure to check the overhead. Pull ceiling if needed. Don't let fire get behind you.

6. Never give up your working hose to the stretch. If there isn't enough hose without it, add more before you go interior.

7. Check your nozzles every tour. If you are using fog nozzles make sure the pattern is set to straight. Also check the GPM on any adjustable gallonage nozzles.

8. Another No Truck Rule. If you arrive with nothing showing, grab the can and a hook. If you find a small fire on investigation, you can probably put it out while the line is getting stretched

9. Don't be afraid to pull the big line.

10. ALWAYS TRAIN THROUGHOUT YOUR CAREER. Those that think they have pulled enough hose should retire before they get someone killed.


Great topic Lt.

Hankins
First, know where you are going, and the best way to get there.
Secure your water source as soon as you can, booster water doesn't last long when you are flowing good gpm.
Stretch the right line. Just because it is an interior attack, that doesn't mean you always stretch the preconnect 1 3/4.
Know the engine and the tools on it.
Just because you are stretching a line, you still need to grab your tools.
A efficient stretch is a fast stretch, but fast stretch isn't always an efficient stretch.
Chase kinks. Kinks kill.
Know your buildings, and how they burn.
The faster you put out the fire, the better it is for everyone. Engine, truck, and victims.
Train. Train. Train. When you think you know it all, what you didn't learn will kill you, and your company.
Love this topic! I'll add to a few of the great comments already made.......

Stretch and advance the line- don't pile and pull.

Structure fires should be put out from the inside of the structure. If we are squirtin' water from the outside it's a weeny roast and we're losing the firefight.

Engine guys should pull and flow a line every day, whether it's a training or a job.

An engine crew that can't get water quickly and efficiently should be flogged and publicly humiliated; starting with the company officer.

Just because you're on an engine doesn't mean you shouldn't know how to use the irons.
1. GO TO THE RIGHT PLACE
2. LAY A SUPPLY LINE
3. PULL AN ATTACK LINE
4. PROTECT MEANS OF EGRESS
5. CONFINE AND EXTINGUISH
1. To quote the late Andy Fredericks "Take time to make time" take the time to properly stretch and flake out your line and it will make your advance quicker and more efficient.

2. Put out the fire and everything else gets better.
You, and Andy, are exactely right Brett.

How many times have we seen the initial handline get all %$#$%^ up because the crew didn't take the extra 5 seconds to do it right.

Remember the old saying. The garbage man doesn't get excited when he comes around the corner and sees garbage!!!
Know your rig
Have assigned positions
Don't crowd the nozzleman (You don't need to be breathing down his neck)
The easiest way to mitigate the incident, is to put the fire out. SO DO IT!
Know where all the crews are at. Don't spray water from the outside, especially if there are crews inside (STEAM STEAM STEAM)
Don't bust every window in the house (Think Vent)
Get a primary search done as you go, but remember if the fire goes out, so does most of your rescue problem
The day you quit training, is the day you retire!
I forgot to add,

Take pride in your Company, Station and Department.

Kristopher Holien said:
Know your rig
Have assigned positions
Don't crowd the nozzleman (You don't need to be breathing down his neck)
The easiest way to mitigate the incident, is to put the fire out. SO DO IT!
Know where all the crews are at. Don't spray water from the outside, especially if there are crews inside (STEAM STEAM STEAM)
Don't bust every window in the house (Think Vent)
Get a primary search done as you go, but remember if the fire goes out, so does most of your rescue problem
The day you quit training, is the day you retire!

RSS

Policy Page

CONTRIBUTORS NOTE

Our contributors' posts are not vetted by the Fire Engineering technical board, and reflect the views and opinions of the individual authors. Anyone is welcome to participate.

For vetted content, please go to www.fireengineering.com/archive/.

Fire Engineering Editor in Chief Bobby Halton
We are excited to have you participate in our discussions and interactive forums. Before you begin posting, please take a moment to read our policy page. -- Bobby Halton

Be Alert for Spam
We actively monitor the community for spam, however some does slip through. Please use common sense and caution when clicking links. If you suspect you've been hit by spam, e-mail peter.prochilo@clarionevents.com.

FE Podcasts


Check out the most recent episode and schedule of
UPCOMING PODCASTS

© 2020   Created by fireeng.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service