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Ladies and Gentlemen,
I'm looking for advice on keeping tools rust free in the cold, northern winter months. Last night I cleaned and wire-wheeled all the hand tools on our engine. After 4 runs they were gathering condensation and rust again on their striking surfaces where they were left untreated.
The problem is that the engine goes from the warm station, into the cold, back into the warm station, back into the cold...you get the point. This is prime weather for condensation. Tonight I'll try leaving the compartment doors up, allowing for good air flow into the compartments while we're in quarters.
FYI, I did read Tom Tulipano's post in 'Paint or No Paint' regarding Boeshield and will try to locate some of this product.
Thank you all for your time...

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Replies to This Discussion

Until you locate Boeshield, try putting a thin coat of motor oil on the tools.
Rick Fritz said:
Until you locate Boeshield, try putting a thin coat of motor oil on the tools.

We have many spray lubricants issued to us, even spray dry graphite. The issue is that it's been drilled into our heads to "never lubricate the surface of a striking tool." I'd be willing to try most suggestions, so I'll bring up the motor oil. Something has to be done with these tools, they're a constant mess.
How about a light coat of WD-40? It was originally designed to remove moisture from ICBMs, so I would think it would also work on hand tools
Timothy Overly said:
How about a light coat of WD-40? It was originally designed to remove moisture from ICBMs, so I would think it would also work on hand tools

It will Tim, and thanks for the suggestion.
The problem lies in the fact that the tools are in a constant state of moisture. We often find small puddles forming it the bottom of the compartments. WD-40 is used regularly in the summer and fall with great effectiveness.
Spray on dry graphite has been the most effective lubricant so far. It goes on and dries like a grey spraypaint, except for the striking surfaces that we have to keep 'clean' from everything.
I think it's going to come down to good old fashioned, clean your tools twice a day, station life.
Now, the only challenge is getting everyone else onboard!
Lubricate the striking surface, it won't hurt the tool or the surface. WD40 contains 1,1, 1 tricloroethane which will EAT any glue that maybe helping to hold the head of the tool on, additionally it will EAT resin tool handles. Do not use real WD40!
Jeff Clayton said:
Rick Fritz said:
Until you locate Boeshield, try putting a thin coat of motor oil on the tools.

We have many spray lubricants issued to us, even spray dry graphite. The issue is that it's been drilled into our heads to "never lubricate the surface of a striking tool." I'd be willing to try most suggestions, so I'll bring up the motor oil. Something has to be done with these tools, they're a constant mess.
You need some type of large scale dessicant for those compartments!

Jeff Clayton said:
Timothy Overly said:
How about a light coat of WD-40? It was originally designed to remove moisture from ICBMs, so I would think it would also work on hand tools

It will Tim, and thanks for the suggestion.
The problem lies in the fact that the tools are in a constant state of moisture. We often find small puddles forming it the bottom of the compartments. WD-40 is used regularly in the summer and fall with great effectiveness.
Spray on dry graphite has been the most effective lubricant so far. It goes on and dries like a grey spraypaint, except for the striking surfaces that we have to keep 'clean' from everything.
I think it's going to come down to good old fashioned, clean your tools twice a day, station life.
Now, the only challenge is getting everyone else onboard!
Thanks Rick,
Most of us spray the WD-40 onto a rag, then apply it to the bare metal portions of the tool (our axes come painted, except for the blade area and the pick). I was always tought to apply it this way to avoid overspray on the handle.
It wasn't until I started reading forums here at FE that I learned that WD-40 would do so much damage to other parts of the tool! Thanks for the information, I'll be sure to pass it on to the rest of the crew.
Jeff
Do the same application method only use motor oil, any grade will do!
Jeff Clayton said:
Thanks Rick,
Most of us spray the WD-40 onto a rag, then apply it to the bare metal portions of the tool (our axes come painted, except for the blade area and the pick). I was always tought to apply it this way to avoid overspray on the handle.
It wasn't until I started reading forums here at FE that I learned that WD-40 would do so much damage to other parts of the tool! Thanks for the information, I'll be sure to pass it on to the rest of the crew.
Jeff
Jeff -
A product I found that works very well is CRC Dry Moly Lube spray #03084. http://www.crcindustries.com/ei/content/prod_detail.aspx?S=Y&PN...
I spray it on any tools that normally rust quickly during winter conditions, hydrant wrenches, axes, pike pole tips etc. it sprays on and soon dries to a thin film that looks like a "parkerized" finish. We also use it on extrication tools as it also acts as a lubricant on the cutter jaws. For tool inspection the coating can quikly be removed with a solvent and coating reapplied as needed.

Bob Shovald
Bob,
Thanks for the input...we'll look into this product. The clean then coat, clean then coat, clean then coat method seems to be working for now. Although, elbow grease is the best protector I've found!
Just joined this group, "Tools of the Trade". The only paint we put on our hand tools is two 2" bands of paint that is our dpartment colors. This is used for ease in identifying our gear/equipment, this is in addition to a reflective sticker with our depatment name and rig number.
I have found that a light coating of machine oil, 3 in 1 comes to mind helps out on ax heads etc... Its less messy than some of the others. Its easier to control the application too because a few drops on the object is sufficient and rub it in with a rag.
For the handles, we have a combination of wood and fiberglass, we use electrical friction tape. To add a more stout grip we use old ice hockey skate laces wrapped up and down the length of the handle and then cover this with more friction tape.
It seems to work for us anyways and our tools seem to be rust free for the most part.

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