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I work for a small suburban fire dept. and we don't always have enough men at both stations (due to run volume) to start internal fire attack due to 2 in 2 out rules. My question is this, what about the old fashioned way of finding the room of origin breaking a window, putting the hose in on a tight stream and rotating to knock down the fire or control it until help arrives? I have heard conflicting arguments about pushing the fire. Will a tight stream push the fire?

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Dave LeBlanc said:
I think that I have some concern with the notion that 2 in and 2 out is our saving grace. The standard was not originally designed for the Fire Service, and in my mind leaves us in a position of doing more work with less firefighters. At the same time it provides us with a false sense of security, as we are being lead to believe that 2 firefighters outside are enough to rescue 2 firefighters inside.

Now before you tar and feather me......I am not saying we should throw the baby out with the bath water. However I am not sure that 2 in and 2 out provides us with what we need when it comes to deciding when and how to attack a fire in a building.

Look into Phoenix's studies after the death of Brett Tarver. Look at how many firefighters it took to locate a mising firefighter, let alone perform the rescue.

Do you think it is possible that 4 people on the hoseline, stretching and venting may produce a quicker, safer, better result?

Amen, I have been saying the same thing since its inception. It allows the fire to burn longer while the firefighters wait on the outside for the 2 out to arrive. Keep the 2 in 2 out for what it was meant to be; confined space rescue.

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