Fire Engineering Training Community

Where firefighters come to talk training

To all. Is there anyone that knows where I maybe able to aquire a Boston Adz tool? I googled it and have tried finding it but can not. If anyone could point me in the direction of anywhere or anyone that would be able to help me I would appreciate it.
Stay Low and Stay Safe

Views: 2889

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

-Never heard of it. Can you explain or post a photo?
I remember reading the article and seeing the adz mentioned in it. Here is tha article from brother Lt. Ciampo in the March issue of FE Truck Company Tools Across the Country
Below are pictures of the Boston Adz or Adz from the article.

-Brad the photos are interesting. Are the pictures accurate in that this tool is intended as an overhaul tool? With a wooden handle it doesn't seem that this tool can function as an adz for forcible entry like a halligan.
-If the intent is to use the tool like a pike pole/hook I would recommend a roof hook/adz hook or a Boston rake which is available on line.
Hey Matt. The Adz is a single purpose tool that is best used by rotating 90 degrees after inserted in between something, to force or spread. It provides great leverage for forcing anything apart ( the blade is long, and it's width is about2", (so there is great mechanical advantage when rotated) or pulling off trim, sills, or even to spread a door/ frame. It is more limited in uses than a Halligan, but performs specific tasks very well. Some officers carry them. I prefer a flathead, with another member having a halligan.
The guys in Boston are saying it's a very versatile truck co. tool. Brother I see your point on the handle being hickory and he does mention that if you use it wrong, you will break the handle and it will be useless. If you wanted you could probably replace it with a composite.

According to Lt. Mitchell who worte the section for the Boston tools, he claims that "The adz is by far the most versatile tool. With our older building construction, thousands of 21⁄2- and 31⁄2-story wood-frame dwellings, and our “triple deckers,” gaining access to the seat of the fire and stopping fire extension are extremely important. The adz can help us with that task in many ways. It can do everything that a halligan, ax, or pike pole can do. It can force doors, strike a halligan, act as a sledgehammer, pull ceilings and walls, break windows, gap a door for insertion of a hydraulic forcible entry tool, open roofs, and remove door and window trim.

The adz was developed in Massachusetts in the 1920s and introduced to our department in the 1970s by Ladder Co. 7. The tool’s head assembly is a thin steel blade that is 15 inches long and 21⁄8 inches wide; the tool weighs five pounds and has a hickory handle. The opposite end of the tool has a small hammer-like head, which we use for striking objects. A modified version of the adz that may be more beneficial for firefighting operations is in development.

The power of the tool is in its leverage. Insert the blade into a door (like the adz end of the halligan bar) to gap the door. Next, rotate the handle downward toward the floor to gap and force the door. Do not push or pull the tool’s handle in other directions when forcing a door. The 21⁄8-inch blade will create enough force and pressure to force the door as you turn the handle toward the floor. During its initial introduction to the department, we saw the tool’s power when the ladder truck’s jack was lowered on the adz. Then the adz was rotated to the floor, and it lifted up the truck. We use the same concept of rotating the handle to remove door frames, window and door moldings, and floorboards during overhaul. Remember that the tool is designed for sideways leverage, not prying. If you use the tool incorrectly, it will be useless, and the handle may break.

When coupled with a halligan tool, these two tools become a formidable forcible entry punch in the ladder company’s arsenal. You can also use the adz to open up walls and ceilings made of lath and plaster. It’s light enough to use repeatedly overhead. It is also of tremendous value in sliding in between double closing doors (common in storefronts): Simply insert the blade and use a little finesse and leverage, and you will open the door without causing any damage.

We also use the adz for peaked-roof operations, and it fares better than an ax. There is less chance of the adz sticking in the tar in three layers of shingles, especially when compared with a pickhead ax. Depending on the roof’s pitch, you have to use short, concentrated swings while opening up the roof. We use the adz at auto extrications and elevator removal operations. It can also be found in some of the engine companies’ complement of tools. The adz doesn’t replace a tool like the halligan, but it does offer additional options for ladder company operations".
Hey James, thank you for the input, but I am looking for info on how to get an Adz tool. I read the article in Fire Engineering and was very interested in getting one. If you could give me an idea of where to get one I would appreciate it. Thanks Brother.

James B O'Brien said:
Hey Matt. The Adz is a single purpose tool that is best used by rotating 90 degrees after inserted in between something, to force or spread. It provides great leverage for forcing anything apart ( the blade is long, and it's width is about2", (so there is great mechanical advantage when rotated) or pulling off trim, sills, or even to spread a door/ frame. It is more limited in uses than a Halligan, but performs specific tasks very well. Some officers carry them. I prefer a flathead, with another member having a halligan.
The Boston Adz can be purchased from the Vulcan tool company under the name Building Wreckers Adz. They cost $103.60.

Stay Safe.
The tool is originally a building demolition tool a Boston Jake brought to work with him.  Google Demo Contracting tools and see what happens.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Policy Page

CONTRIBUTORS NOTE

Our contributors' posts are not vetted by the Fire Engineering technical board, and reflect the views and opinions of the individual authors. Anyone is welcome to participate.

For vetted content, please go to www.fireengineering.com/archives.

Fire Engineering Editor in Chief Bobby Halton
We are excited to have you participate in our discussions and interactive forums. Before you begin posting, please take a moment to read our policy page HERE. -- Bobby Halton

Be Alert for Spam
We actively monitor the community for spam, however some does slip through. Please use common sense and caution when clicking links. If you suspect you've been hit by spam, e-mail peter.prochilo@clarionevents.com.

FE Podcasts


Check out the most recent episode and schedule of
UPCOMING PODCASTS

Groups

© 2019   Created by fireeng.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service