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Guys, I'm sure this has been talked about before but as a result of Billy G's class at FDIC last week I want to develop a good SOG that deals with size ups and 360's on the fire scene for residentials. I know they're out there. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks, Mike

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We recommitted ourselves to ensuring the 360 after a Billy G presentation as well.

"First Due Officer shall conduct a 360 walk around where ever practical or cause all four sides to be viewed and reported."

Basically on all privates dwellings we expect the officer to make a full 360 while the crew is pulling the line, and going about their initial tasks. The 360 should be easily done before entry of the crew, unless something is found that changes things? Ie: victims in the rear or immediate hazards. I also think this is important as you can really confirm or reasonably deny a basement fire, which may not be readily apparent from a limited side view. After seeing all four sides, you have a better chance at finding smoke from the sills, basement windows, Bilco doors, etc. Given the concerns with newer lightweight floor joists, this has become an even more significant factor before committing to the interior. We may still go, but I like knowing when we're above any fire.

In commercials or multiple dwellings, we strive for the same 360, but realizing size and attached buildings are a huge factor, we assign someone to see the rear, often by driving around to another parallel street. Many pre-planned boxes have these assignments meted out to the first due apparatus. Given our limited initial resources we cannot afford to get our aerial or initial line placement wrong, and with buildings with multiple wings we must remain fluid until we confirm the best route or placement.
Here is an example of a quick size up SOG

1. Quick Size-up Plan.

1.1 The key to any successful firefighting operation is good rapid size-up. This size-up includes many different aspects from building information to fire information. Size-up dictates the tactics used. This procedure is designed with the junior officer in mind. There will be occasions when command level officers will not be available. We will depend on you to keep our personnel safe and assure that good firefighting tactics are used.

2. Defensive vs. Offensive.

2.1 Defensive operations.

2.1.1 Defensive Operations are outside tactics. The acronym below is helpful in determining large hoselines and outside tactics. There are many situations that a defensive operation would be warranted. They are listed below.

2.1.2 Truss loft involvement. There is no for sure way to tell fire is involving areas that can not be seen from the outside. Smoke showing from the eaves is a very good indication you have a fire in the truss loft. Please don’t confuse a truss roof with standard construction. Fires involving standard roof construction should be attacked from the inside and require vertical ventilation.

2.1.3 Large fires in small buildings.

2.1.4 Fires involving large unoccupied buildings.

2.1.5 Basement fires in evacuated buildings.

2.1.6 Multiple floors on fire.

2.1.7 Hazardous materials fires.

2.2 Offensive operations.

2.2.1 Life protection is the first and foremost responsibility of all firefighters whether they are Truck Co. members or Engine Co. members. This can not be done from the outside. When savable lives hang in the balance, an offensive operation is warranted.

2.2.2 Fires involving residential occupancies in which only room and contents are involved or two or less rooms are involved. LCS can be used for multiple room fires in place of a defensive operation. (Only at residential fires)

2.2.3 Fires involving sprinklered buildings.

3. First arrival size-up

3.1 CHOWEET

3.1.1 Construction- what is the general construction used for the building?

3.1.2 Height- how many stories are you dealing with?

3.1.3 Occupancy- what is the occupancy used for? Is it the same as it was originally
intended?

3.1.4 What you have showing- smoke, fire, people, and where.

3.1.5 Exposures- do you have exterior or interior exposures.

3.1.6 Evacuation- is anybody evacuated or is everybody evacuated.

3.1.7 Tactics- Defensive / Offensive, LCS or small lines, rescue or extinguishment.

4. Size-up that dictates tactics

4.1 LETS

4.1.1 Location- Find the fire. What sides is it showing from, what floor is it on, where is
the smoke.

4.1.2 Extension- Where is the fire going. Put lines between it.

4.1.3 Time / Type- What type of fire is it and how long has it been burning.

4.1.4 Severity / Size- (large fire in a vacant warehouse vs a small fire under the wooden
stairs of an occupied school)

5. Tactical Priorities that must be accomplished at every fire.

5.1 RECEVO

5.1.1 Rescue the trapped occupants. This means get the people in the most danger out
first.
5.1.2 Exposures need to be covered. Do not waste all of your resources trying to
extinguish a fire that can not be. Contain the fire to the fire building and don’t burn
more than one building down.

5.1.3 Contain the fire to the area of origin, the room of origin, the floor of origin or the
building of origin.

5.1.4 Extinguish the fire.

5.1.5 Ventilate the fire with the appropriate tactic. Peaked roof gets horizontal
ventilation and a flat roof gets vertical ventilation. Top floor fires always get
vertical ventilation.

5.1.6 Overhaul the fire areas and areas of potential fire spread. Overhaul needs to be
done as the fire is being fought.

6. System analysis of a structure fire. V Dunn FDNY.

6.1

FIRE STRUCTURE EXPOSURES RESOURCES UNPREDICTABLE
Size Construction Life hazard Apparatus Time
Location Occupancy Adjacent buildings Personnel Weather
Extent Area Interior Water supply
Severity Height Aux appliances



7. Large Caliber Hose Stream Selection

7.1 ADULTS

7.1.1 Advanced fire on arrival.

7.1.2 Defensive operations.

7.1.3 Unable to determine the size or location of the fire.

7.1.4 Large area of fire or large uncompartmentalized fire.

7.1.5 Tons of water needed for control.

7.1.6 Standpipe operations.



8. It is important to remember t
hat the fire dictates the tactics used. Each fire will be different but all need to be sized up. This is only a portion of the knowledge needed to command structural fires. Use this as a guide and only a guide.
Very well laid out. Thanks for the response. Mike

Nate Skewes said:
Here is an example of a quick size up SOG

1. Quick Size-up Plan.

1.1 The key to any successful firefighting operation is good rapid size-up. This size-up includes many different aspects from building information to fire information. Size-up dictates the tactics used. This procedure is designed with the junior officer in mind. There will be occasions when command level officers will not be available. We will depend on you to keep our personnel safe and assure that good firefighting tactics are used.

2. Defensive vs. Offensive.

2.1 Defensive operations.

2.1.1 Defensive Operations are outside tactics. The acronym below is helpful in determining large hoselines and outside tactics. There are many situations that a defensive operation would be warranted. They are listed below.

2.1.2 Truss loft involvement. There is no for sure way to tell fire is involving areas that can not be seen from the outside. Smoke showing from the eaves is a very good indication you have a fire in the truss loft. Please don’t confuse a truss roof with standard construction. Fires involving standard roof construction should be attacked from the inside and require vertical ventilation.

2.1.3 Large fires in small buildings.

2.1.4 Fires involving large unoccupied buildings.

2.1.5 Basement fires in evacuated buildings.

2.1.6 Multiple floors on fire.

2.1.7 Hazardous materials fires.

2.2 Offensive operations.

2.2.1 Life protection is the first and foremost responsibility of all firefighters whether they are Truck Co. members or Engine Co. members. This can not be done from the outside. When savable lives hang in the balance, an offensive operation is warranted.

2.2.2 Fires involving residential occupancies in which only room and contents are involved or two or less rooms are involved. LCS can be used for multiple room fires in place of a defensive operation. (Only at residential fires)

2.2.3 Fires involving sprinklered buildings.

3. First arrival size-up

3.1 CHOWEET

3.1.1 Construction- what is the general construction used for the building?

3.1.2 Height- how many stories are you dealing with?

3.1.3 Occupancy- what is the occupancy used for? Is it the same as it was originally
intended?

3.1.4 What you have showing- smoke, fire, people, and where.

3.1.5 Exposures- do you have exterior or interior exposures.

3.1.6 Evacuation- is anybody evacuated or is everybody evacuated.

3.1.7 Tactics- Defensive / Offensive, LCS or small lines, rescue or extinguishment.

4. Size-up that dictates tactics

4.1 LETS

4.1.1 Location- Find the fire. What sides is it showing from, what floor is it on, where is
the smoke.

4.1.2 Extension- Where is the fire going. Put lines between it.

4.1.3 Time / Type- What type of fire is it and how long has it been burning.

4.1.4 Severity / Size- (large fire in a vacant warehouse vs a small fire under the wooden
stairs of an occupied school)

5. Tactical Priorities that must be accomplished at every fire.

5.1 RECEVO

5.1.1 Rescue the trapped occupants. This means get the people in the most danger out
first.
5.1.2 Exposures need to be covered. Do not waste all of your resources trying to
extinguish a fire that can not be. Contain the fire to the fire building and don’t burn
more than one building down.

5.1.3 Contain the fire to the area of origin, the room of origin, the floor of origin or the
building of origin.

5.1.4 Extinguish the fire.

5.1.5 Ventilate the fire with the appropriate tactic. Peaked roof gets horizontal
ventilation and a flat roof gets vertical ventilation. Top floor fires always get
vertical ventilation.

5.1.6 Overhaul the fire areas and areas of potential fire spread. Overhaul needs to be
done as the fire is being fought.

6. System analysis of a structure fire. V Dunn FDNY.

6.1

FIRE STRUCTURE EXPOSURES RESOURCES UNPREDICTABLE
Size Construction Life hazard Apparatus Time
Location Occupancy Adjacent buildings Personnel Weather
Extent Area Interior Water supply
Severity Height Aux appliances



7. Large Caliber Hose Stream Selection

7.1 ADULTS

7.1.1 Advanced fire on arrival.

7.1.2 Defensive operations.

7.1.3 Unable to determine the size or location of the fire.

7.1.4 Large area of fire or large uncompartmentalized fire.

7.1.5 Tons of water needed for control.

7.1.6 Standpipe operations.



8. It is important to remember t
hat the fire dictates the tactics used. Each fire will be different but all need to be sized up. This is only a portion of the knowledge needed to command structural fires. Use this as a guide and only a guide.
Mike
I am not going to even try to improve on the statements below. They are all well thought out. I just want to add one "street smart" (sorry, I hate using that phrase, but it is the only one I can come up with!) technique that will save you time, sweat, and maybe someone's life (read: your crews). I was taught long ago ( I am a LT on a 3 man Engine Company) to NEVER put my SCBA on while I am responding to the job. This accomplishes 3 extremely important, life saving things at once.
1) I will always have my seatbelt on when I am responding. I never seen a FF not have to remove his/her seatbelt at some point in time while putting on the SCBA in the bracketts.
2) When I arrive on scene, I get out of my rig before I give my size up, reach back in and grab my SCBA, and don it standing where I can see the job.
3) This allows me to size up the job, see where and what kind of stretch we have to make, calms me down, and most importantly, identifies ways that I can get my crew OUT of the building. Then I give a real brief, and I do mean brief size up to incoming companies.

I did not like it at first, because I thought things were going too slow. But after a while, I found I was "taking a second to save minutes". and actually things sped up, WITHOUT TUNNEL VISION, stopping the moth to the flame phenomena. Anyway, try it. It really works
Russ Chapman
Milford CT FD

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