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Besides throwing out the EMS supplies. Would you change the Nozzles, Hose Bed Design, Hose Size, or Procedures.

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I'm really liking the new concept of keeping everything lower, i.e-- crosslays, rear hosebeds. I always feel as if I'm going to fall off the rig trying rack hose, I have a little bit of a height disadvantage too. I'm not sure what can be done, but I don't like the mentality of thinking the preconnect crosslays will reach everything. Training on hose estimating, pull lines will definately help but I'm trying to get some to change the way they think.
I have been a big advocate of smooth bore nozzles for a long time. I've been in the fire service for over 25 years and have seen some bad things done with fog nozzles. I think it's the "adjustability" of the pattern thats to blame. On wide fog, it does nothing but drop the smoke and heat down on top of us, and even on "straight" stream its still kinda a fog pattern, just tighter. It's all up to if the member on the nozzle has it set right as to what happens. The smooth bore is FF proof. Its always set on a solid stream. And when used right at the right pressure, I think it does the best job. And safest job. The only place a fog nozzle could find a home is on the trash line, to conserve water.

All this may be entirely wrong in your world, and since I ride the Tower more than I do the Squad....what do I know about hose. But when the smoke , heat and steam come down and find me....I know someones got a fog nozzle flowing....

As Ray says....Keep fire in your life.
I agree with Mr. Bloomer, fog nozzles belong on the trash line. Unfortunately, I don't have the ability to make the decision which nozzle to use. At my paid dept, it is combination nozzles all the way around, no smooth bores. I was informed that the smooth bore uses to much water, causes too much water damage and disrupts the thermal balance. At my volunteer dept., it is just the lack of not wanting to change. We have trained and seen the difference first hand but the upper brass won't allow the change.
On my engine I would lower the hose bed, got to all smooth bores, shorten the turn radius, switch from cross lays to speed lays, and intagrate a foam tank into the pump or cafs,
The first thing I'd change about our engines is that the engine spec. committee would actually listen to the guys that ride the engines. Nothing like making recommendations and getting a new rig that has just the opposite of what we asked for.......but that's another story.

Like Larry said, I would drop the crosslays down to a average working mans height. Ours are currently a pain in the butt to pull and reload. The biggest thing I would like to see is an additional hose dividers in the rear to carry more of an assortment of hose loads. Currently we only carry 200' section of 3" donut rolled on top and 200' of 2 1/2" attack line. I'd like to have more choices on my stretches rather than relying on only pre-connects all the time. There are many more things but most are smaller items that are just a nuisance. We finally won the fight to get smooth bores back on the engines; even if they are only a slug tip from a break apart. Sometimes changes come measured in inches rather than yards.
First...don't call me Mr Bloomer....I am old...but not that old. Second....how would it disturb a thermal balance more than a fog nozzle? Has your chief been in a burning building lately? And as for flowing too much water....if a 100 gpm fog nozzle takes...say.... 5 minutes to put out a room and contents job ( and thats way too long)...thats 500 gallons. And a smooth bore can put that same 500 gallons on the fire in less than half the time...and I think more efficiently.....whats the difference....other than the fire going out in half the time....without bringing down the smoke and heat if applied correctly. And are your fog nozzles the automatic type? They tend to go out of calibration when banged around...which we all know never happens to a nozzle....so much so that a automatic nozzle could be flowing only 50 gpm and look like its flowing well and has a good shape and distance. we had this happen to our auto nozzles. We turned them all into lamps. It always burns my butt that the chiefs don't listen to the indians about what works and what doesn't. (not all you chiefs...just most of you..and you know who you are). I know change costs money...but so do burned down structures......not to mention stays in the burn center...or funerals. Listen to your firefighters.......they know what they need to get the job done.
Maybe if we were not trying to be all things to all people (calls) then we could have lower hose beds. If you have decent hydrant spacing you should have an apparartus with a low hose bed. However like already mentioned you have an apparatus committee and nothing changes or it does but just the wrong way. As for nozzles a choice is always best.
At the risk of sounding like a broken record...low hose beds, low ladders. Smaller rigs. A better place to store EMS Supplies. Get rid of crosslays (doubt that will ever happen:)) If we HAVE to put stuff on there for the "one in a million" calls, have it stored up and out of the way. The newer trucks just seem like such monstrosities to me...
I'm with Ray here. We need to stop loading these as if their going to a parade every weekend and dress them as if their going to battle, which we know they are!. Keep the truck stuff on the truck and the engine stuff, well you know. As Rick Lasky says, "Egos eat Brains" and this seems so true at times. Too much red tape. Ok, I'm done venting, that felt good. Thanks Ray! Oh yeah, Hi Mr. Bloomer!
Greg...I used to like you.
Sorry Art, just a sign of respect sir. Stay Safe!
You called me sir now.....

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