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An average of 117 people died each day from Motor vehicle Crashes In the United States in 2006. One person every 12 minutes!!! Do you train as if it is the real deal or put a car on 4 wheels and teach to the "Probationary Level" level twice a year? Many departments spend more time training on the "once in ten year" call instead of spending time on the "Routine" call. (There is no such thing as routine) I feel that this is another classic example of the fire service missing the "basics" of firefighting.

How often should we train on extrication? What are your training objectives when you train on extrication? Do your objectives meet the requirements outlined in the N.F.P.A. 1670 standard?

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I think we should train as often as we can on extrication. It is like anything else the less you use it the more likely to be less proficient you will be when it comes time to perform. I have seen a neighboring dept who has trained probably once a year on extrication pull up to an extrication pull off all the tools and then stand there try a few things and once we arrived with our rescue we went into service and completed the rescue in a matter of minutes. As for our training objectives it depends on the drill but our program is currently setup to cover the basics, new vehicle tech, air bags, stabilization techniques, patient management, torches and hand tools as well as some other basic extrication. Each one of these topics is covered in a training session throughout the year. These sessions usually occur on a weeknight our weekend depending upon the topic to be covered. As for meeting N.F.P.A. 1670 all of our members are required to be either trained to operations or technician level of this standard to even step onto the rescue truck. Soon we will require members to attend a certain amount of drills to keep up with there ability to ride the truck.
Attached is some pictures of some examples of the type of training we do.
Hi Chris, I agree with David on this one. Training as often as you can not only improve your department, but it will give confidence in your teams that are working. I do all the extrication training for my Dept. and we were a bit lax in the past because of training issues and all the time spent on trying to just keep up with the NFPA quals. that needed to be met. Every couple of months I try to offer training on a weekend for people that would like to cut stuff up, and to learn a few things that maybe were encountered on a call. For me there's nothing better than learning hands on with the tools and what the limits are for the tools you have. We even set up a scenario at the county fair so the public can see what goes on. Some of the neighboring Depts. don't train as often as we do and we get some of there personnel from time to time which I have no problem with sense we have to work with each other anyway. So far this year we have trained at least 4 times in 5 months. And I have another scheduled in 2 weeks with Heavy Rescue using the wreckers that we have local. I am lucky to have a wrecker owner that we are close to and even invite to our award banquets. This is something that you need to remind yourself also, and that is what are your wreckers capable of doing with you in case you need them. Doing training with them can improve scene times. As far as objectives are concerned you need to meet the NFPA standard and then some. Of course they wont be met in training one time a year. I try to stretch things out for the year and schedule the standard as we go hitting different points along the way. We have quite alot of wrecks, and many more than we have fires. Keeping up with training is important and to be proficient is another ball game with all the other things we have to do. But doing it as often as you can will help things be easier later when it counts. I hope this answers some of the questions you have. Geeze I can ramble forever on this subject. Be safe.
Bob Pinder said:
Hi Chris, I agree with David on this one. Training as often as you can not only improve your department, but it will give confidence in your teams that are working. I do all the extrication training for my Dept. and we were a bit lax in the past because of training issues and all the time spent on trying to just keep up with the NFPA quals. that needed to be met. Every couple of months I try to offer training on a weekend for people that would like to cut stuff up, and to learn a few things that maybe were encountered on a call. For me there's nothing better than learning hands on with the tools and what the limits are for the tools you have. We even set up a scenario at the county fair so the public can see what goes on. Some of the neighboring Depts. don't train as often as we do and we get some of there personnel from time to time which I have no problem with sense we have to work with each other anyway. So far this year we have trained at least 4 times in 5 months. And I have another scheduled in 2 weeks with Heavy Rescue using the wreckers that we have local. I am lucky to have a wrecker owner that we are close to and even invite to our award banquets. This is something that you need to remind yourself also, and that is what are your wreckers capable of doing with you in case you need them. Doing training with them can improve scene times. As far as objectives are concerned you need to meet the NFPA standard and then some. Of course they wont be met in training one time a year. I try to stretch things out for the year and schedule the standard as we go hitting different points along the way. We have quite alot of wrecks, and many more than we have fires. Keeping up with training is important and to be proficient is another ball game with all the other things we have to do. But doing it as often as you can will help things be easier later when it counts. I hope this answers some of the questions you have. Geeze I can ramble forever on this subject. Be safe.
I am also a huge advocate for creating unique scenario based training. This can be as simple as having a door wedged against the tree or a car down an embankment. This gives firefighters the chance to think beyond the vehicle on 4 wheels. I also like to let the firefighters go and then analyze the actions they took and ask why they did what they did. This gives me a chance o learn as well. Implementing a command structure give the officers the ability to practice as well.

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