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It's always a question I like to ask so I thought I would throw it out here.

-What is in your pockets?

Please list what you have and what you use them for. If you have any speciality tools or modified tools attach a picture and explain how you made them.

I personally carry:

-Combo Screw Driver
-Vice Grips
-Wire Cutters
-Leatherman's Tool
-30' of looped webbing
-6' of looped webbing
-50' of rope
-A few door wedges
-Safety glasses
-Window punch
-Latex gloves
-Small pad of paper, pen, and marker

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I carry everything on the above list with the addition of a pocket knife and utility knife.

Stay Safe Brother!!!
I carry a set of Door wedges, wire cutters, a combo screw driver, spanner wrench (collapsable), flash light, safety glasses, latex gloves, and a pen and paper. I used to carry some sort of rope but the problem is there is only so many pockets were and how do you store 50' of rope?
Thanks for the comments. It has been 2 years since I posted this and almost forgot about it. Let try and get some more discussion!!
I carry pretty much everything in the above list but also a pair of Straight Cut Aviation Tin Snips. While not very effective on small diameter hard wire they make quick work on the majority of materials used for drop cielings, and (uncharged!!!) electrical wiring. All of the tools used for disentanglment I've drilled through the handles and attatched wrist lanyards with Para 550 cord so that even if dropped during use they're not lost.

-I love this question and that it pops up with regularity. I also find it very entertaining to read the list of gear that would make the Home Depot proud. Most firefighters carry far to much crap in their gear and most of it never gets used. " I carry it just in case". Hahaha. Get rid of stuff you have not used in several months. It only creates snags. 

-The best thing Lowe's firefighters can do is take some aggressive, real world survival training and see how much of a hindrance all that sh$t in your pockets really is. Jim McCormack puts on a fantastic course in Indianapolis at Fire Department Training Network. Take his class and after just a few humbling hours you'll be unloading your gear and dumping the useless snags and weight.

-One very important question I ask rookies that carry half of aisle 4 of Lowe's in their pockets (or even better on their helmets) is, "How much of this crap can you locate and get out of your pocket AND operate while wearing structure gloves?" If you can't locate, retrieve and operate this stuff, like a leatherman, while wearing structure gloves, then you don't need to carry it.

-Equipment for personal escape should be carried in conjunction with an entire escape system. If you think you can utilize a piece of webbing or rope for personal escape you have not received training on this issue, neither have you thought it through or done enough research into the topic. Personal bailout should be accomplished in less than 15 seconds, from recognition to escape from the environment; this includes deployment, locating anchor points etc. Don't think so? Try it. Personal escape bailout maneuvers are a last resort that are very time critical; 15 seconds. Personal escape gear should be a kit attached to a bailout harness that is worn, ready to deploy, on or under the coat... not in the pockets.

-Leatherman? Really? Does anyone really use this thing regularly enough to justify carrying it? Can anyone actually find it in their pocket, pull it out and use it while wearing structure gloves? If you can't you don't need it. If its for some thing else, as Tom Brennen use to say, "we ain't going to the same fires". You need some tools? Go to the rig and get a tool box with the real things.

-Webbing is light weight and very useful. The bad thing about webbing is most guys never check it regularly so when they need it they spend time unrolling it and trying to get the knots out. Daisy chain it and regularly clean it, washing it with soap and water, and re chain it. Keep it in a pocket without other sh$t that'll get caught in the webbing. 

-At some point over the years I've carried most of the crap listed here only to find out how useless it is.

-Escape gear is in a rapid deployment pouch designed for escape gear, which is mounted onto the escape harness; an escape system... not in the pockets.

-In one pocket I've got a couple of carabineers, in another pocket there is 20' of 2" tubular webbing daisy chained. 

-Clipped to another pocket corner is a sturdy, heavy duty yet disposable knife that has a blade that can cut wire or anything else. And yes, the knife is appropriately sized so as to be easily retrievable and useable while wearing structure gloves. 

-I've got some work gloves in another pocket just for convenience and a flashlight clipped to the front of the coat.  You need any other tools? Bring them with you; real tools.

Honestly nothing other than a Multi Tool, and seatbelt cutter , our personal rescue equipment is in a CMC pouch attached to our harness.

I picked this up at Lowes CRESENT CUTTERS.  They looked user friendly and tough.  So far I have been able to cut through chain link fence, 16 penny nails, dryer vent wire, and all sorts of wire without having to pull it tight to cut through it.  Its spring loaded so it comes open automatically.  With the spring assistance you can cut tougher objects or have the ease to operate it with your thumb and fingers in a tight spot. The spring also allows you to use one of the grips off an object to push against, binding of wire is limited and the cutting force remains strong.  Very easy with fire gloves on, definitely worth $14.00.

Totally agree with Michael, some people carry way to much stuff. All I carry is a utility knife, multi screw driver, cutters. Of course I have my bailout kit and some pieces of webbing too. Those are essential! 

What type of rope were you carrying? I carry 50' of Sterling rope (heat resistant kind) in a gallon zip-lock bag with two carabiner's and a DCD. I just fold the rope in there nice and neat, it fit's great in my side bunker pants pocket. 

Jeremy A Brito said:
I carry a set of Door wedges, wire cutters, a combo screw driver, spanner wrench (collapsable), flash light, safety glasses, latex gloves, and a pen and paper. I used to carry some sort of rope but the problem is there is only so many pockets were and how do you store 50' of rope?

I threw this exact question in a blog a couple of weeks ago.

 

http://community.fireengineering.com/profiles/blog/show?id=1219672:...


Well stated and I couldnt agree more.  I too started out with a mobile hardware store in my gear, but the first survival class I took, I went to do the head first bail onto the ladder and the guys butting it almost got a concussion from all the hardware that fell from my bunkers.  Not to mention the weight of the stuff, you get fatigued pretty quick.

I cut the hardware store down to just a few chocks and flashlight in my helmet, my 35' personal escape rope and biner in my right pants pocket, a knife in my right coat pocket and a folding 5-in-one spanner tool with glass breaker, gas shut-off and O2 wrench that I use for EMS also.  Other than that, as Captain, I tell my crews if I see them get off the truck without either hand tools and flashlight or the nozzle, you might as well not even get off.  Im tired of seeing guys jump out of the truck and run up to the scene to the iC for orders only to have to go all the way back to the truck to get the tools they need...Waste.

 

Besides, the more room you have in your pockets the more food you can cram in there during rehab!!!

Stay Safe everyone.
Michael Bricault said:

-I love this question and that it pops up with regularity. I also find it very entertaining to read the list of gear that would make the Home Depot proud. Most firefighters carry far to much crap in their gear and most of it never gets used. " I carry it just in case". Hahaha. Get rid of stuff you have not used in several months. It only creates snags. 

-The best thing Lowe's firefighters can do is take some aggressive, real world survival training and see how much of a hindrance all that sh$t in your pockets really is. Jim McCormack puts on a fantastic course in Indianapolis at Fire Department Training Network. Take his class and after just a few humbling hours you'll be unloading your gear and dumping the useless snags and weight.

-One very important question I ask rookies that carry half of aisle 4 of Lowe's in their pockets (or even better on their helmets) is, "How much of this crap can you locate and get out of your pocket AND operate while wearing structure gloves?" If you can't locate, retrieve and operate this stuff, like a leatherman, while wearing structure gloves, then you don't need to carry it.

-Equipment for personal escape should be carried in conjunction with an entire escape system. If you think you can utilize a piece of webbing or rope for personal escape you have not received training on this issue, neither have you thought it through or done enough research into the topic. Personal bailout should be accomplished in less than 15 seconds, from recognition to escape from the environment; this includes deployment, locating anchor points etc. Don't think so? Try it. Personal escape bailout maneuvers are a last resort that are very time critical; 15 seconds. Personal escape gear should be a kit attached to a bailout harness that is worn, ready to deploy, on or under the coat... not in the pockets.

-Leatherman? Really? Does anyone really use this thing regularly enough to justify carrying it? Can anyone actually find it in their pocket, pull it out and use it while wearing structure gloves? If you can't you don't need it. If its for some thing else, as Tom Brennen use to say, "we ain't going to the same fires". You need some tools? Go to the rig and get a tool box with the real things.

-Webbing is light weight and very useful. The bad thing about webbing is most guys never check it regularly so when they need it they spend time unrolling it and trying to get the knots out. Daisy chain it and regularly clean it, washing it with soap and water, and re chain it. Keep it in a pocket without other sh$t that'll get caught in the webbing. 

-At some point over the years I've carried most of the crap listed here only to find out how useless it is.

-Escape gear is in a rapid deployment pouch designed for escape gear, which is mounted onto the escape harness; an escape system... not in the pockets.

-In one pocket I've got a couple of carabineers, in another pocket there is 20' of 2" tubular webbing daisy chained. 

-Clipped to another pocket corner is a sturdy, heavy duty yet disposable knife that has a blade that can cut wire or anything else. And yes, the knife is appropriately sized so as to be easily retrievable and useable while wearing structure gloves. 

-I've got some work gloves in another pocket just for convenience and a flashlight clipped to the front of the coat.  You need any other tools? Bring them with you; real tools.

I have...

-2 door chocks in my coat and one on my lid

-Wire Cutters

-16ft of webbing water knotted to make a loop

-Electrical tape and Medical tape

-Spring loaded center punch

-A saw blade tool

-Safety glasses

-Medical gloves

-Flat head & Phillips head screwdrivers

-and 50ft of Sterling 8mm lifeline in a bag on my Gemtor

-also i carry a leatherman on my radio strap along with a co meter

 

stay safe brothers

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