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Does anyone know of, or have used a mechanical advantage system for rescuing a firefighter who has fallen through a h*** in a floor? I am specifically looking for something quick and easy to use. Myself and four other Brothers are tasked with refining and improving or RIT training program with our department. Any input is welcomed.

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The issue of a firefighter through the floor is one that has got to be rapid, and almost always labor intensive. We train the basic removal techniques, ladder in the h***, handcuff knot, or utilizing a loop in an attack line. We have a pre-made haul system in bag that I suppose could be used, the problem will be obtaining a high enough anchor point. In deterioting conditions probalbly difficult and not feasible. I would suggest you guys taking a look at Frank Ricci's video on Rapid Intervention Prevention, we are getting away from RIT a little in my Dept. and trying to focus on the basic, knowing the building, knowing fire behavior, reading smoke and the importance of the 360. For about a year on my shift each member took a turn persenting a LODD Niosh report to the other members. It made for great training, and let us focus on how the deaths could have been prevented. Some members put alot of research into and came up with powerpoints or a hands on training to make it more productive. It almost always came down to basic skills. That's just my two cents on the subject.
Thanks for the input Mike. We are currently using the RIT training as a way of reminding our guys of the reality of the possible situations they may face. The training itself is really just bread and butter firefighting techniques ie proper search methods, proper radio usage, tic, accountability. I am on our high angle rescue team and am well aware of the time factors involved in turning a rit situation into a tech rescue, I was just wondering if anyone had any experience with a quick and dirty mechanical advantage system? The high point would be the biggest problem, I was thinking of exposing a joist in the ceiling above the h***, or perhaps using a ladder to span the h*** then levering the victim out once you've used the m.a. to get him to the mouth of the h***.
Thanks for the training ideas, nobody will be screwing around when the trainer is using LODDs as simulations.

Mike Frazer said:
The issue of a firefighter through the floor is one that has got to be rapid, and almost always labor intensive. We train the basic removal techniques, ladder in the h***, handcuff knot, or utilizing a loop in an attack line. We have a pre-made haul system in bag that I suppose could be used, the problem will be obtaining a high enough anchor point. In deterioting conditions probalbly difficult and not feasible. I would suggest you guys taking a look at Frank Ricci's video on Rapid Intervention Prevention, we are getting away from RIT a little in my Dept. and trying to focus on the basic, knowing the building, knowing fire behavior, reading smoke and the importance of the 360. For about a year on my shift each member took a turn persenting a LODD Niosh report to the other members. It made for great training, and let us focus on how the deaths could have been prevented. Some members put alot of research into and came up with powerpoints or a hands on training to make it more productive. It almost always came down to basic skills. That's just my two cents on the subject.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tFQaEjOHfY
Check out this link. I haven,t tried it yet. But looks quick enough. Just webbing that we should already have with us?
Niel the ladder thing you spoke of works but, no matter what you do it is very labor intensive We have tried many different ways and I not sure that one way will work every time. This is a trial and error thing I would say try many different ways and see what works for your group. Great post
We have made up a preset in a bag for just such a scenario. We took a 100ft rope, folded it in half then tied a figure eight on a bight in the middle of that. On the loop we have a ladder belt "beener". We operate FAST teams with 6 Firefighters, our minimum( one liason and 5 operators). What we end op with is a 25 ft lowering and raising system. To lower a rescuer though the h*** in the floor, the rop is looped under the rescuer's arms he is lowered into the h*** by the other four firefighters. ( remember we doubled the rope, tied a figure on a bight in the middle right? Off of that knot and beener, four tags lines radiate!). Four firefighters lower the rescuer, the rescuer packages the victim appropriately, hooks the ladder clip tothe victim. The four firefighters up top haul the victim out of the h*** ( 4-1 advantage!!!! can be done with three firefighters3-1 advantage!!) The rope sling can then be lowered down to rescue the rescuer afterwards. If you need pics to illustrate this you can contact me at fyrfyterx@yahoo.com
Also if the victim is conscious and uninjured he can simply step on the loop, wraps his/her arms around the haul linesand be hauled up to the edge of the h***.
Hey Niel,
My department has just through training for a down fire fighter through the h*** two months ago. I too have to agree about the labor intensive, did they fall through a residential or commercial floor, but after teaching at the Baltimore Expo this year with Captain Dugan FDNY #123 Truck, we got to work right across the street from Assist. Chief Jim Crawford from Pittsburgh , PA. and his staff who teaches (RIT Classes), I learned that the Engine Companies must continue put water on the fire while rescue operations are on the way. There is no right way and no wrong way just as long that you have a least two plans for a trap fire fighter. "God Bless" in you quest for a simply answer to a complicated forum. Stay Fire Safe.... JKJ

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