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large area search.What do you use?what works and what does not.

I want to see what different departments are using for large area search,and what works for them and what does not work.

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Joe if you go to All Hands Fire equip. go to search and guide we have the chicago style kit with markers and rings.Tha rings are for tying off with the tag lines.The ring also acts as a directional guide.
Chris Poyner said:
Joe if you go to All Hands Fire equip. go to search and guide we have the chicago style kit with markers and rings.Tha rings are for tying off with the tag lines.The ring also acts as a directional guide.
The search rope that Chicago Fire Department uses is call a " R.A.S.P " BAG. We have two on our department and they work GREAT!!! http://xtremerescue.com/RASPBag.php
Ryan Slade said:
Chris Poyner said:
Joe if you go to All Hands Fire equip. go to search and guide we have the chicago style kit with markers and rings.Tha rings are for tying off with the tag lines.The ring also acts as a directional guide.
Joe said:
Ryan Slade said:
Chris Poyner said:
Joe if you go to All Hands Fire equip. go to search and guide we have the chicago style kit with markers and rings.Tha rings are for tying off with the tag lines.The ring also acts as a directional guide.
Joe ,
Go to all hands fire equipment .com look under search and guide you should find what your looking for.
In early 2008 I put together a 200 foot "survival" line to replace a "bag of rope" put onto the truck. I researched quit a bit about ropes and decided on a bag like FDNY is using. Because there is a good chance that this rope will be destroyed I opted to purchase utility rope from a local hardware store that has alternating red and green threads in it. The cost for the utility rope was less than $10. I bought two bags of 100 foot each. The other reason for the utility rope is that 200 feet fits into this bag with the knots. A co-worker purchased the same rope bag but could only get 150 feet into the bag using the commercially available search rope. Our attack lines are also 200 feet in length so I can go the same depth into a building as hose lines. Because making knots shortens your "survival" rope, I placed knots at every 25 feet rather than 10 as some suggest. I have a knot for every 25 feet so at 50 feet there is two knots spaced 3 inches apart. I also put a directional knot 12 inches away from the distance knots. The ropes are of course knotted together at 100 feet. And of course at 100 feet are 4 knots and a directional knot. The end of the rope is tied in the bottom of the bag to prevent losing the rope. On the end that remains at the entrance I have a loop with a quick snap and also a commercially available door prop. I mentioned the green and red colors in the rope. I designed the system so you can look at it and move toward the green to safety. Red is toward the hazard.
Remember that this line is only for guidance so it needs to be lightweight and functional. It is not meant for an escape rope.
Good Luck
I have to disagree with Ken, Sorry brother, a search line/rope is YOU AND YOUR crews life line to get out of the building safely, Buy a good search rope ie.. 9mm kevlar rope that can with stand upto 950 degrees, Also the search line can have upwards of several hundred pound firefighters pulling on the rope. You can either spend the money now or a lot more for a couple of funnerals. Being cheap on your life line is like using a being cheap on your airpacks, why not just use a plastic bottle to breath from. Sorry brother, I have been to, too many funnerals of my 16 years in the fire service. Be safe out there, And train as if your life depends on it BECAUSE IT DOSE!!!!

Ken Yarnell said:
In early 2008 I put together a 200 foot "survival" line to replace a "bag of rope" put onto the truck. I researched quit a bit about ropes and decided on a bag like FDNY is using. Because there is a good chance that this rope will be destroyed I opted to purchase utility rope from a local hardware store that has alternating red and green threads in it. The cost for the utility rope was less than $10. I bought two bags of 100 foot each. The other reason for the utility rope is that 200 feet fits into this bag with the knots. A co-worker purchased the same rope bag but could only get 150 feet into the bag using the commercially available search rope. Our attack lines are also 200 feet in length so I can go the same depth into a building as hose lines. Because making knots shortens your "survival" rope, I placed knots at every 25 feet rather than 10 as some suggest. I have a knot for every 25 feet so at 50 feet there is two knots spaced 3 inches apart. I also put a directional knot 12 inches away from the distance knots. The ropes are of course knotted together at 100 feet. And of course at 100 feet are 4 knots and a directional knot. The end of the rope is tied in the bottom of the bag to prevent losing the rope. On the end that remains at the entrance I have a loop with a quick snap and also a commercially available door prop. I mentioned the green and red colors in the rope. I designed the system so you can look at it and move toward the green to safety. Red is toward the hazard.
Remember that this line is only for guidance so it needs to be lightweight and functional. It is not meant for an escape rope.
Good Luck
Ryan Slade said:
I have to disagree with Ken, Sorry brother, a search line/rope is YOU AND YOUR crews life line to get out of the building safely, Buy a good search rope ie.. 9mm kevlar rope that can with stand upto 950 degrees, Also the search line can have upwards of several hundred pound firefighters pulling on the rope. You can either spend the money now or a lot more for a couple of funnerals. Being cheap on your life line is like using a being cheap on your airpacks, why not just use a plastic bottle to breath from. Sorry brother, I have been to, too many funnerals of my 16 years in the fire service. Be safe out there, And train as if your life depends on it BECAUSE IT DOSE!!!!

Ken Yarnell said:
In early 2008 I put together a 200 foot "survival" line to replace a "bag of rope" put onto the truck. I researched quit a bit about ropes and decided on a bag like FDNY is using. Because there is a good chance that this rope will be destroyed I opted to purchase utility rope from a local hardware store that has alternating red and green threads in it. The cost for the utility rope was less than $10. I bought two bags of 100 foot each. The other reason for the utility rope is that 200 feet fits into this bag with the knots. A co-worker purchased the same rope bag but could only get 150 feet into the bag using the commercially available search rope. Our attack lines are also 200 feet in length so I can go the same depth into a building as hose lines. Because making knots shortens your "survival" rope, I placed knots at every 25 feet rather than 10 as some suggest. I have a knot for every 25 feet so at 50 feet there is two knots spaced 3 inches apart. I also put a directional knot 12 inches away from the distance knots. The ropes are of course knotted together at 100 feet. And of course at 100 feet are 4 knots and a directional knot. The end of the rope is tied in the bottom of the bag to prevent losing the rope. On the end that remains at the entrance I have a loop with a quick snap and also a commercially available door prop. I mentioned the green and red colors in the rope. I designed the system so you can look at it and move toward the green to safety. Red is toward the hazard.
Remember that this line is only for guidance so it needs to be lightweight and functional. It is not meant for an escape rope.
Good Luck
Joe said:
Ryan Slade said:
I have to disagree with Ken, Sorry brother, a search line/rope is YOU AND YOUR crews life line to get out of the building safely, Buy a good search rope ie.. 9mm kevlar rope that can with stand upto 950 degrees, Also the search line can have upwards of several hundred pound firefighters pulling on the rope. You can either spend the money now or a lot more for a couple of funnerals. Being cheap on your life line is like using a being cheap on your airpacks, why not just use a plastic bottle to breath from. Sorry brother, I have been to, too many funnerals of my 16 years in the fire service. Be safe out there, And train as if your life depends on it BECAUSE IT DOSE!!!!

Ken Yarnell said:
In early 2008 I put together a 200 foot "survival" line to replace a "bag of rope" put onto the truck. I researched quit a bit about ropes and decided on a bag like FDNY is using. Because there is a good chance that this rope will be destroyed I opted to purchase utility rope from a local hardware store that has alternating red and green threads in it. The cost for the utility rope was less than $10. I bought two bags of 100 foot each. The other reason for the utility rope is that 200 feet fits into this bag with the knots. A co-worker purchased the same rope bag but could only get 150 feet into the bag using the commercially available search rope. Our attack lines are also 200 feet in length so I can go the same depth into a building as hose lines. Because making knots shortens your "survival" rope, I placed knots at every 25 feet rather than 10 as some suggest. I have a knot for every 25 feet so at 50 feet there is two knots spaced 3 inches apart. I also put a directional knot 12 inches away from the distance knots. The ropes are of course knotted together at 100 feet. And of course at 100 feet are 4 knots and a directional knot. The end of the rope is tied in the bottom of the bag to prevent losing the rope. On the end that remains at the entrance I have a loop with a quick snap and also a commercially available door prop. I mentioned the green and red colors in the rope. I designed the system so you can look at it and move toward the green to safety. Red is toward the hazard.
Remember that this line is only for guidance so it needs to be lightweight and functional. It is not meant for an escape rope.
Good Luck

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